Nitric oxide in exhaled and aspirated nasal air as an objective measure of human response to indoor air pollution

Barbara Kolarik, L. Lagercrantz, Jan Sundell

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled and aspirated nasal air was used to objectively assess human response to indoor air pollutants in a climate chamber exposure experiment. The concentration of NO was measured before exposure, after 2, and 4.5 h of exposure, using a chemiluminescence NO analyzer. Sixteen healthy female subjects were exposed to two indoor air pollutants and to a clean reference condition for 4.5 h. Subjective assessments of the environment were obtained by questionnaires. After exposure (4.5 h) to the two polluted conditions a small increase in NO concentration in exhaled air was observed. After exposure to the reference condition the mean NO concentration was significantly reduced compared to pre-exposure. Together these changes resulted in significant differences in exhaled NO between exposure to reference and polluted conditions. NO in nasal air was not affected by the exposures. The results may indicate an association between polluted indoor air and subclinical inflammation.Measurement of nitric oxide in exhaled air is a possible objective marker of subclinical inflammation in healthy adults.
Original languageEnglish
JournalIndoor Air
Volume19
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)145-152
ISSN0905-6947
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Phthalates
  • Sick Building Syndrome
  • Sensation of 'dryness'
  • Nitric oxide
  • Subclinical inflammation

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