Near field acoustic holography with particle velocity transducers

Finn Jacobsen, Yang Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

809 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Near field acoustic holography is usually based on measurement of the pressure. This paper describes an investigation of an alternative technique that involves measuring the normal component of the acoustic particle velocity. A simulation study shows that there is no appreciable difference between the quality of predictions of the pressure based on knowledge of the pressure in the measurement plane and predictions of the particle velocity based on knowledge of the particle velocity in the measurement plane. However, when the particle velocity is predicted close to the source on the basis of the pressure measured in a plane further away, high spatial frequency components corresponding to evanescent modes are not only amplified by the distance but also by the wave number ratio (kz/k). By contrast, when the pressure is predicted close to the source on the basis of the particle velocity measured in a plane further away, high spatial frequency components are reduced by the reciprocal wave number ratio (k/kz). For the same reason holography based on the particle velocity is less sensitive to transducer mismatch than the conventional technique based on the pressure. These findings are confirmed by an experimental investigation made with a p-u sound intensity probe produced by Microflown.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAcoustical Society of America. Journal
Volume118
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)3139-3144
ISSN0001-4966
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Bibliographical note

Copyright (2005) Acoustical Society of America. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the Acoustical Society of America.

Keywords

  • near field
  • particle velocity
  • holography

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Near field acoustic holography with particle velocity transducers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this