Navigating the Future V: Marine Science for a Sustainable Future European Marine Board: - Position Paper 24

Ferdinando Boero, Valerie Cummins, Jeremy Gault, Geir Huse, Catharina J.M. Philippart, Ralph Schneider, Anne Marie Treguier, Sukru Besiktepe, Gilles Boeuf, Carlos Garcia-Soto, Kevin Horsburgh, Heidrun Kopp, Francesca Malfatti, Patrizio Mariani, Nele Matz-Lück, Jan Mees, Luis Menezes Pinheiro, Denis Lacroix, Martin Le Tissier, David M. PatersonGerald Schernewski, Olivier Thebaud, Michiel B. Vandegehuchte, Martin Visbeck, Jan-Marcin Weslawski

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Abstract

Navigating the Future is a publication series produced by the European Marine Board providing future perspectives on marine science and technology in Europe. Navigating the Future V (NFV) highlights new knowledge obtained since Navigating the Future IV1 (2013). It is set within the framework of the 2015 Paris Agreement2 and builds on the scientific basis and recommendations of the IPCC reports3. NFV gives recommendations on the science required during the next decade to deliver the ocean we need to support a sustainable future. This will be important for the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development4 (2021 – 2030), the implementation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals5 and the European Commission’s next framework programme, Horizon Europe6 (2021 - 2027). There is a growing need to strengthen the links between marine science, society and policy since we cannot properly manage what
we do not know.
In recent years, the ocean and seas have received new prominence in international agendas. To secure a safe planet a priority is the management of the ocean as a “common good for humanity”, which requires smarter observations to assess of the state of the ocean and predictions about how it may change in the future. The ocean is a three-dimensional space that needs to be managed over time (thus four-dimensional), and there is a need for management and conservation practices that integrate the structure and function of marine ecosystems into these four dimensions (Chapter 2). This includes understanding the dynamic spatial and temporal interplay between ocean physics, chemistry and biology. Multiple stressors including climate change, pollution and over-fishing affect the ocean and we need to better understand and predict their interactions and identify tipping points to decide on management priorities (Chapter 3). This should integrate our understanding of land-ocean-atmosphere processes and approaches to reducing impacts. An improved science base is also needed to help predict and minimize the impact of extreme events such as storm surges, heat waves, dynamic sea-floor processes and tsunamis (Chapter 4). New technologies, data handling and modelling approaches will help us to observe, understand and manage our use of the fourdimensional ocean and the effect of multiple stressors (Chapter 5).
Addressing these issues requires a strategic, collective and holistic approach and we need to build a community of sustainability scientists that are able to provide evidence-based support to policy makers within the context of major societal challenges (Chapter 6). We outline new frontiers, knowledge gaps and recommendations needed to manage the ocean as a common good and to develop solutions for a sustainable future (Chapter 7). The governance of sustainability should be at the core of the marine research agenda through co-production and collaboration with stakeholders to identify priorities. There is need for a fully integrated scientific assessment of resilience strategies, associated trade-offs and underlying ethical concepts for the ocean, which should be incorporated into decision support frameworks that involve stakeholders from the outset. To allow the collection, processing and access to all data, a key priority is the development of a business model that ensures the long-term economic sustainability of ocean observations.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherEuropean Marine Board
Number of pages92
ISBN (Electronic)9789492043757
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019
SeriesMarine Board-ESF Position Paper
Number24

Cite this

Boero, F., Cummins, V., Gault, J., Huse, G., Philippart, C. J. M., Schneider, R., ... Weslawski, J-M. (2019). Navigating the Future V: Marine Science for a Sustainable Future European Marine Board: - Position Paper 24. European Marine Board. Marine Board-ESF Position Paper, No. 24 https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.2809392
Boero, Ferdinando ; Cummins, Valerie ; Gault, Jeremy ; Huse, Geir ; Philippart, Catharina J.M. ; Schneider, Ralph ; Treguier, Anne Marie ; Besiktepe, Sukru ; Boeuf, Gilles ; Garcia-Soto, Carlos ; Horsburgh, Kevin ; Kopp, Heidrun ; Malfatti, Francesca ; Mariani, Patrizio ; Matz-Lück, Nele ; Mees, Jan ; Pinheiro, Luis Menezes ; Lacroix, Denis ; Le Tissier, Martin ; Paterson, David M. ; Schernewski, Gerald ; Thebaud, Olivier ; Vandegehuchte, Michiel B. ; Visbeck, Martin ; Weslawski, Jan-Marcin. / Navigating the Future V: Marine Science for a Sustainable Future European Marine Board : - Position Paper 24. European Marine Board, 2019. 92 p. (Marine Board-ESF Position Paper; No. 24).
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abstract = "Navigating the Future is a publication series produced by the European Marine Board providing future perspectives on marine science and technology in Europe. Navigating the Future V (NFV) highlights new knowledge obtained since Navigating the Future IV1 (2013). It is set within the framework of the 2015 Paris Agreement2 and builds on the scientific basis and recommendations of the IPCC reports3. NFV gives recommendations on the science required during the next decade to deliver the ocean we need to support a sustainable future. This will be important for the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development4 (2021 – 2030), the implementation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals5 and the European Commission’s next framework programme, Horizon Europe6 (2021 - 2027). There is a growing need to strengthen the links between marine science, society and policy since we cannot properly manage whatwe do not know.In recent years, the ocean and seas have received new prominence in international agendas. To secure a safe planet a priority is the management of the ocean as a “common good for humanity”, which requires smarter observations to assess of the state of the ocean and predictions about how it may change in the future. The ocean is a three-dimensional space that needs to be managed over time (thus four-dimensional), and there is a need for management and conservation practices that integrate the structure and function of marine ecosystems into these four dimensions (Chapter 2). This includes understanding the dynamic spatial and temporal interplay between ocean physics, chemistry and biology. Multiple stressors including climate change, pollution and over-fishing affect the ocean and we need to better understand and predict their interactions and identify tipping points to decide on management priorities (Chapter 3). This should integrate our understanding of land-ocean-atmosphere processes and approaches to reducing impacts. An improved science base is also needed to help predict and minimize the impact of extreme events such as storm surges, heat waves, dynamic sea-floor processes and tsunamis (Chapter 4). New technologies, data handling and modelling approaches will help us to observe, understand and manage our use of the fourdimensional ocean and the effect of multiple stressors (Chapter 5).Addressing these issues requires a strategic, collective and holistic approach and we need to build a community of sustainability scientists that are able to provide evidence-based support to policy makers within the context of major societal challenges (Chapter 6). We outline new frontiers, knowledge gaps and recommendations needed to manage the ocean as a common good and to develop solutions for a sustainable future (Chapter 7). The governance of sustainability should be at the core of the marine research agenda through co-production and collaboration with stakeholders to identify priorities. There is need for a fully integrated scientific assessment of resilience strategies, associated trade-offs and underlying ethical concepts for the ocean, which should be incorporated into decision support frameworks that involve stakeholders from the outset. To allow the collection, processing and access to all data, a key priority is the development of a business model that ensures the long-term economic sustainability of ocean observations.",
author = "Ferdinando Boero and Valerie Cummins and Jeremy Gault and Geir Huse and Philippart, {Catharina J.M.} and Ralph Schneider and Treguier, {Anne Marie} and Sukru Besiktepe and Gilles Boeuf and Carlos Garcia-Soto and Kevin Horsburgh and Heidrun Kopp and Francesca Malfatti and Patrizio Mariani and Nele Matz-L{\"u}ck and Jan Mees and Pinheiro, {Luis Menezes} and Denis Lacroix and {Le Tissier}, Martin and Paterson, {David M.} and Gerald Schernewski and Olivier Thebaud and Vandegehuchte, {Michiel B.} and Martin Visbeck and Jan-Marcin Weslawski",
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Boero, F, Cummins, V, Gault, J, Huse, G, Philippart, CJM, Schneider, R, Treguier, AM, Besiktepe, S, Boeuf, G, Garcia-Soto, C, Horsburgh, K, Kopp, H, Malfatti, F, Mariani, P, Matz-Lück, N, Mees, J, Pinheiro, LM, Lacroix, D, Le Tissier, M, Paterson, DM, Schernewski, G, Thebaud, O, Vandegehuchte, MB, Visbeck, M & Weslawski, J-M 2019, Navigating the Future V: Marine Science for a Sustainable Future European Marine Board: - Position Paper 24. Marine Board-ESF Position Paper, no. 24, European Marine Board. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.2809392

Navigating the Future V: Marine Science for a Sustainable Future European Marine Board : - Position Paper 24. / Boero, Ferdinando; Cummins, Valerie; Gault, Jeremy; Huse, Geir; Philippart, Catharina J.M.; Schneider, Ralph; Treguier, Anne Marie; Besiktepe, Sukru; Boeuf, Gilles; Garcia-Soto, Carlos; Horsburgh, Kevin; Kopp, Heidrun; Malfatti, Francesca; Mariani, Patrizio; Matz-Lück, Nele; Mees, Jan; Pinheiro, Luis Menezes; Lacroix, Denis; Le Tissier, Martin; Paterson, David M.; Schernewski, Gerald; Thebaud, Olivier; Vandegehuchte, Michiel B.; Visbeck, Martin; Weslawski, Jan-Marcin.

European Marine Board, 2019. 92 p. (Marine Board-ESF Position Paper; No. 24).

Research output: Book/ReportReportResearch

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AU - Cummins, Valerie

AU - Gault, Jeremy

AU - Huse, Geir

AU - Philippart, Catharina J.M.

AU - Schneider, Ralph

AU - Treguier, Anne Marie

AU - Besiktepe, Sukru

AU - Boeuf, Gilles

AU - Garcia-Soto, Carlos

AU - Horsburgh, Kevin

AU - Kopp, Heidrun

AU - Malfatti, Francesca

AU - Mariani, Patrizio

AU - Matz-Lück, Nele

AU - Mees, Jan

AU - Pinheiro, Luis Menezes

AU - Lacroix, Denis

AU - Le Tissier, Martin

AU - Paterson, David M.

AU - Schernewski, Gerald

AU - Thebaud, Olivier

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AU - Visbeck, Martin

AU - Weslawski, Jan-Marcin

PY - 2019

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N2 - Navigating the Future is a publication series produced by the European Marine Board providing future perspectives on marine science and technology in Europe. Navigating the Future V (NFV) highlights new knowledge obtained since Navigating the Future IV1 (2013). It is set within the framework of the 2015 Paris Agreement2 and builds on the scientific basis and recommendations of the IPCC reports3. NFV gives recommendations on the science required during the next decade to deliver the ocean we need to support a sustainable future. This will be important for the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development4 (2021 – 2030), the implementation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals5 and the European Commission’s next framework programme, Horizon Europe6 (2021 - 2027). There is a growing need to strengthen the links between marine science, society and policy since we cannot properly manage whatwe do not know.In recent years, the ocean and seas have received new prominence in international agendas. To secure a safe planet a priority is the management of the ocean as a “common good for humanity”, which requires smarter observations to assess of the state of the ocean and predictions about how it may change in the future. The ocean is a three-dimensional space that needs to be managed over time (thus four-dimensional), and there is a need for management and conservation practices that integrate the structure and function of marine ecosystems into these four dimensions (Chapter 2). This includes understanding the dynamic spatial and temporal interplay between ocean physics, chemistry and biology. Multiple stressors including climate change, pollution and over-fishing affect the ocean and we need to better understand and predict their interactions and identify tipping points to decide on management priorities (Chapter 3). This should integrate our understanding of land-ocean-atmosphere processes and approaches to reducing impacts. An improved science base is also needed to help predict and minimize the impact of extreme events such as storm surges, heat waves, dynamic sea-floor processes and tsunamis (Chapter 4). New technologies, data handling and modelling approaches will help us to observe, understand and manage our use of the fourdimensional ocean and the effect of multiple stressors (Chapter 5).Addressing these issues requires a strategic, collective and holistic approach and we need to build a community of sustainability scientists that are able to provide evidence-based support to policy makers within the context of major societal challenges (Chapter 6). We outline new frontiers, knowledge gaps and recommendations needed to manage the ocean as a common good and to develop solutions for a sustainable future (Chapter 7). The governance of sustainability should be at the core of the marine research agenda through co-production and collaboration with stakeholders to identify priorities. There is need for a fully integrated scientific assessment of resilience strategies, associated trade-offs and underlying ethical concepts for the ocean, which should be incorporated into decision support frameworks that involve stakeholders from the outset. To allow the collection, processing and access to all data, a key priority is the development of a business model that ensures the long-term economic sustainability of ocean observations.

AB - Navigating the Future is a publication series produced by the European Marine Board providing future perspectives on marine science and technology in Europe. Navigating the Future V (NFV) highlights new knowledge obtained since Navigating the Future IV1 (2013). It is set within the framework of the 2015 Paris Agreement2 and builds on the scientific basis and recommendations of the IPCC reports3. NFV gives recommendations on the science required during the next decade to deliver the ocean we need to support a sustainable future. This will be important for the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development4 (2021 – 2030), the implementation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals5 and the European Commission’s next framework programme, Horizon Europe6 (2021 - 2027). There is a growing need to strengthen the links between marine science, society and policy since we cannot properly manage whatwe do not know.In recent years, the ocean and seas have received new prominence in international agendas. To secure a safe planet a priority is the management of the ocean as a “common good for humanity”, which requires smarter observations to assess of the state of the ocean and predictions about how it may change in the future. The ocean is a three-dimensional space that needs to be managed over time (thus four-dimensional), and there is a need for management and conservation practices that integrate the structure and function of marine ecosystems into these four dimensions (Chapter 2). This includes understanding the dynamic spatial and temporal interplay between ocean physics, chemistry and biology. Multiple stressors including climate change, pollution and over-fishing affect the ocean and we need to better understand and predict their interactions and identify tipping points to decide on management priorities (Chapter 3). This should integrate our understanding of land-ocean-atmosphere processes and approaches to reducing impacts. An improved science base is also needed to help predict and minimize the impact of extreme events such as storm surges, heat waves, dynamic sea-floor processes and tsunamis (Chapter 4). New technologies, data handling and modelling approaches will help us to observe, understand and manage our use of the fourdimensional ocean and the effect of multiple stressors (Chapter 5).Addressing these issues requires a strategic, collective and holistic approach and we need to build a community of sustainability scientists that are able to provide evidence-based support to policy makers within the context of major societal challenges (Chapter 6). We outline new frontiers, knowledge gaps and recommendations needed to manage the ocean as a common good and to develop solutions for a sustainable future (Chapter 7). The governance of sustainability should be at the core of the marine research agenda through co-production and collaboration with stakeholders to identify priorities. There is need for a fully integrated scientific assessment of resilience strategies, associated trade-offs and underlying ethical concepts for the ocean, which should be incorporated into decision support frameworks that involve stakeholders from the outset. To allow the collection, processing and access to all data, a key priority is the development of a business model that ensures the long-term economic sustainability of ocean observations.

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Boero F, Cummins V, Gault J, Huse G, Philippart CJM, Schneider R et al. Navigating the Future V: Marine Science for a Sustainable Future European Marine Board: - Position Paper 24. European Marine Board, 2019. 92 p. (Marine Board-ESF Position Paper; No. 24). https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.2809392