Mood, activity, and sleep measured via daily smartphone-based self-monitoring in young patients with newly diagnosed bipolar disorder, their unaffected relatives and healthy control individuals

Sigurd Arne Melbye*, Sharleny Stanislaus, Maj Vinberg, Mads Frost, Jakob Eyvind Bardram, Kimie Sletved, Klara Coello, Hanne Lie Kjærstad, Ellen Margrethe Christensen, Maria Faurholt-Jepsen, Lars Vedel Kessing

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Diagnostic evaluations and early interventions of patients with bipolar disorder (BD) rely on clinical evaluations. Smartphones have been proposed to facilitate continuous and fine-grained self-monitoring of symptoms. The present study aimed to (1) validate daily smartphone-based self-monitored mood, activity, and sleep, against validated questionnaires and clinical ratings in young patients with newly diagnosed BD, unaffected relatives (UR), and healthy controls persons (HC); (2) investigate differences in daily smartphone-based self-monitored mood, activity, and sleep in young patients with newly diagnosed BD, UR, and HC; (3) investigate associations between self-monitored mood and self-monitored activity and sleep, respectively, in young patients with newly diagnosed BD. 105 young patients with newly diagnosed BD, 24 UR and 77 HC self-monitored 2 to 1077 days (median [IQR] = 65 [17.5–112.5]). There was a statistically significantly negative association between the mood item on Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and smartphone-based self-monitored mood (B = − 0.76, 95% CI − 0.91; − 0.63, p <0.001) and between psychomotor item on HAMD and self-monitored activity (B = − 0.44, 95% CI − 0.63; − 0.25, p <0.001). Smartphone-based self-monitored mood differed between young patients with newly diagnosed BD and HC (p <0.001), and between UR and HC (p = 0.008) and was positively associated with smartphone-based self-reported activity (p <0.001) and sleep duration (p <0.001). The findings support the potential of smartphone-based self-monitoring of mood and activity as part of a biomarker for young patients with BD and UR. Smartphone-based self-monitored mood is better to discriminate between young patients with newly diagnosed BD and HC, and between UR and HC, compared with smartphone-based activity and sleep. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT0288826.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Number of pages13
ISSN1435-165x
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Bipolar disorder
  • Smartphones
  • Mood
  • Activity
  • Sleep

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