Monitoring microstructural evolution in-situ during cyclic deformation by high resolution reciprocal space mapping

Annika Martina Diederichs, Felix Thiel, Torben Fischer, Ulrich Lienert, Wolfgang Pantleon

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    Abstract

    The recently developed synchrotron technique High Resolution Reciprocal Space Mapping (HRRSM) is used to characterize the deformation structures evolving during cyclic deformation of commercially pure, polycrystalline aluminium AA1050. Insight into the structural reorganization within single grains is gained by in-situ monitoring of the microstructural evolution during cyclic deformation. By HRRSM, a large number of individual subgrains can be resolved within individual grains in the bulk of polycrystalline specimens and their fate, their individual orientation and elastic stresses, tracked during different loading regimes as tension and compression. With this technique, the evolution of dislocation structures in selected grains was followed during an individual load cycle.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number012031
    Book seriesJournal of Physics: Conference Series
    Volume843
    Number of pages9
    ISSN1742-6596
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017
    Event6th International Conference on Fracture Fatigue and Wear (FFW 2017) - Porto, Portugal
    Duration: 26 Jul 201727 Jul 2017

    Conference

    Conference6th International Conference on Fracture Fatigue and Wear (FFW 2017)
    Country/TerritoryPortugal
    CityPorto
    Period26/07/201727/07/2017

    Bibliographical note

    Content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence. Any further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the title of the work, journal citation and DOI. Published under licence by IOP Publishing Ltd

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