Modules in historic building construction according to the Copenhagen Building Code

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    Abstract

    This paper describes an analysis of building works from Copenhagen, Denmark in the period 1850 to 1950. In the study we investigate, based on the theory of product architecture and product modularization, if examples of the use of well-defined interfaces can be found. Furthermore, the aim is to study how the use of such interfaces has influenced former building processes and how they were implemented and kept stable over decades. The result of the study is that at that time a number of standardized interfaces between the individual parts of the building work existed, and that these interfaces have remained unchanged for many years. The interfaces have been identified and modeled seen from a product, process and organizational perspective. The standardized interfaces have been implemented and kept primarily because of the existing legislation, training of project supervisors and craftsmen, and arrangements / agreements between the individual professional groups.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the World Conference on Mass Customization, Personalization, and Co-Creation
    PublisherLulu, Inc.
    Publication date2011
    Publication statusPublished - 2011
    Event2011 World Conference on Mass Customization, Personalization, and Co-Creation: Bridging Mass Customization & Open Innovation - Airport Marriott Waterfront, San Francisco, CA, United States
    Duration: 16 Nov 201119 Nov 2011
    http://corporateinnovation.berkeley.edu/mcpc2011/

    Conference

    Conference2011 World Conference on Mass Customization, Personalization, and Co-Creation
    LocationAirport Marriott Waterfront
    Country/TerritoryUnited States
    CitySan Francisco, CA
    Period16/11/201119/11/2011
    Internet address

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