Minor alterations in the intestinal microbiota composition upon Rotavirus infection do not affect susceptibility to DSS colitis

Kedir Hussen Hamza, Emma Duner, Isabel Ulmert, Armando Arias, Daniel Sorobetea, Katharina Lahl*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Viral triggers at the intestinal mucosa can have multiple global effects on intestinal integrity, causing elevated intestinal barrier strength and relative protection from subsequent inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) induction in various models. As viruses can interfere with the intestinal immune system both directly and indirectly through commensal bacteria, cause-effect relationships are difficult to define. Due to the complexity of putatively causative factors, our understanding of such virus-mediated protection is currently very limited. We here set out to better understand the impact that adult enteric infection with rotavirus (RV) might have on the composition of the intestinal microbiome and on the severity of IBD. We found that RV infection neither induced significant long-lasting microbiota community changes in the small or large intestine nor affected the severity of subsequent dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis. Hence, adult murine RV infection does not exert lasting effects on intestinal homeostasis.
Original languageEnglish
Article number13485
JournalScientific Reports
Volume11
Issue number1
Number of pages11
ISSN2045-2322
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

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