Mild heat treatment does not reduce the colitis-protective effects of bovine colostrum in preterm pigs

Ann Cathrine Findal Støy, Per Torp Sangild, Kerstin Skovgaard, Thomas Thymann, Mette Bjerre, Dereck Edward Winston Chatterton, Stig Purup, Mette Boye, Mette Schmidt, Peter M. H. Heegaard

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    Abstract

    Objective and study: Fresh bovine colostrum (BC) prevents development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm pigs. Spray drying and pasteurization are required to use BC in clinical settings but this may also reduce its bioactivity. In studies on preterm pigs, we compared raw BC with spray dried and pasteurized BC.
    Methods: Preterm pigs were fed total parenteral nutrition for 2 d, followed by two boluses of milk formula (15 mL/kg/3h) and continued enteral feeding with milk formula (FORM, n = 14), fresh BC (COLOS, n = 14), spray dried, powdered BC (POW, n = 8), or spray dried, pasteurized BC (POWPAS, n = 9). Pigs were euthanized after two days of enteral feeding and NEC lesions, intestinal structure, digestive and absorptive functions, microbiota, and tissue protein and mRNA levels of immune factors were analyzed. Finally, we determined the concentrations of some bioactive proteins in the colostrum products and studied treatment-related aggregation of proteins.
    Results: POW and POWPAS pigs showed lowered gut NEC severity, IL-1β and IL-8 levels and lactic acid levels, and higher intestinal villus heights, hexose absorption, hydrolase activities (lactase, maltase, peptidases) than FORM pigs (all P < 0.05). These values in POW and POWPAS groups were similar to those in the COLOS group. Intestinal expression of IL1B, IL6 and IL8 and bacterial abundance score were positively correlated with NEC severity (P < 0.05). Spray drying, and especially pasteurization, increased the breakdown of growth factors (TGF-β1 and -β2) and aggregation of milk proteins.
    Conclusion: Spray drying and pasteurization affect BC proteins but such treatments do not necessarily decrease its trophic and anti-inflammatory effects on the immature intestine. It remains to be studied if such colostrum products also improve gut maturation in preterm infants.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication date2013
    Number of pages2
    Publication statusPublished - 2013
    Event46th Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN 2013) - London, United Kingdom
    Duration: 8 May 201311 May 2013
    http://www.espghan2013.org/

    Conference

    Conference46th Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN 2013)
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    CityLondon
    Period08/05/201311/05/2013
    Internet address

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