Microbial Methylotrophic Metabolism: Recent Metabolic Modeling Efforts and Their Applications In Industrial Biotechnology

Christian Lieven, Markus J. Herrgård, Nikolaus Sonnenschein*

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Developing methylotrophic bacteria into cell factories that meet the chemical demand of the future could be both economical and environmentally friendly. Methane is not only an abundant, low‐cost resource but also a potent greenhouse gas, the capture of which could help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Rational strain design workflows rely on the availability of carefully combined knowledge often in the form of genome‐scale metabolic models to construct high‐producer organisms. In this review, the authors present the most recent genome‐scale metabolic models in aerobic methylotrophy and their applications. Further, the authors present models for the study of anaerobic methanotrophy through reverse methanogenesis and suggest organisms that may be of interest for expanding one‐carbon industrial biotechnology. Metabolic models of methylotrophs are scarce, yet they are important first steps toward rational strain‐design in these organisms.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1800011
JournalBiotechnology Journal
Volume13
Issue number8
Number of pages8
ISSN1860-6768
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Bibliographical note

This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Keywords

  • Cell factories
  • COBRA
  • Metabolic modeling
  • Methylotrophy
  • One-carbon

Cite this

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title = "Microbial Methylotrophic Metabolism: Recent Metabolic Modeling Efforts and Their Applications In Industrial Biotechnology",
abstract = "Developing methylotrophic bacteria into cell factories that meet the chemical demand of the future could be both economical and environmentally friendly. Methane is not only an abundant, low‐cost resource but also a potent greenhouse gas, the capture of which could help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Rational strain design workflows rely on the availability of carefully combined knowledge often in the form of genome‐scale metabolic models to construct high‐producer organisms. In this review, the authors present the most recent genome‐scale metabolic models in aerobic methylotrophy and their applications. Further, the authors present models for the study of anaerobic methanotrophy through reverse methanogenesis and suggest organisms that may be of interest for expanding one‐carbon industrial biotechnology. Metabolic models of methylotrophs are scarce, yet they are important first steps toward rational strain‐design in these organisms.",
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AU - Lieven, Christian

AU - Herrgård, Markus J.

AU - Sonnenschein, Nikolaus

N1 - This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

PY - 2018

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AB - Developing methylotrophic bacteria into cell factories that meet the chemical demand of the future could be both economical and environmentally friendly. Methane is not only an abundant, low‐cost resource but also a potent greenhouse gas, the capture of which could help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Rational strain design workflows rely on the availability of carefully combined knowledge often in the form of genome‐scale metabolic models to construct high‐producer organisms. In this review, the authors present the most recent genome‐scale metabolic models in aerobic methylotrophy and their applications. Further, the authors present models for the study of anaerobic methanotrophy through reverse methanogenesis and suggest organisms that may be of interest for expanding one‐carbon industrial biotechnology. Metabolic models of methylotrophs are scarce, yet they are important first steps toward rational strain‐design in these organisms.

KW - Cell factories

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KW - Metabolic modeling

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KW - One-carbon

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