Mechanical performance of steel fibre reinforced concrete exposed to wet–dry cycles of chlorides and carbon dioxide

Victor Marcos-Meson*, Gregor Fischer, Anders Solgaard, Carola Edvardsen, Alexander Michel

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This paper presents an experimental study investigating the corrosion damage of carbonsteel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) exposed to wet–dry cycles of chlorides and carbon dioxide for two years, and its effects on the mechanical performance of the composite over time. The results presented showed a moderate corrosion damage at fibres crossing cracks, within an approximate depth of up to 40 mm inside the crack after two-years of exposure, for the most aggressive exposure conditions investigated. Corrosion damage did not entail a significant detriment to the mechanical performance of the cracked SFRC over the time-scales investigated. Corrosion damage to steel fibres embedded in uncracked concrete was negligible, and only caused formation of rust marks at the concrete surface. Overall, the impact of fibre damage to the toughness variation of the cracked composite over the time-scale investigated was secondary compared to the toughness variation due to the fibre distribution. The impact of fibre corrosion to the performance of the cracked composite was subject to a size-effect and may only be significant for small cross-sections.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2642
JournalMaterials
Volume14
Issue number10
Number of pages32
ISSN1996-1944
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding: This research was funded by InnovationsFonden, grant number 5016-00103B; and COWIfonden, grant number C-129.02. The APC was covered by MDPI.

Keywords

  • Carbonation
  • Chlorides
  • Corrosion
  • Cracks
  • Exposure time
  • Steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC)
  • Wet–dry cycles

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