Lipopolysaccharide contamination of beta-lactoglobulin affects the immune response against intraperitoneally and orally administered antigen

Susanne Brix Pedersen, T.M.R. Kjær, Vibeke Barkholt, Hanne Frøkiær

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Microbial components in the environment are potent activators of the immune system with capacity to shift the active immune response towards priming of Th1 and/or Th2 cells. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a cell-wall component of Gram- negative bacteria, is extensively present in food products like cow's milk. It is not well established, however, how this presence of LPS affects oral tolerance induction. Methods: We studied the effect of LPS contamination in a commercial preparation of the cow milk protein beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) on antigen-specific immune responses. IgG1/IgG2a production upon intraperitoneal immunization without adjuvant was measured, and oral tolerance induction against beta-LG after administration of either an aqueous solution or water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion of beta-LG was evaluated. Results: LPS contamination of beta-LG provoked a beta-LG-specific IgG2a lresponse, as well as an enhanced beta-LG-specific IgG1 response upon intraperitoneal immunization. Oral tolerance induction to beta-LG was induced by aqueous solutions of beta-LG with and without LPS administration. Conversely, oral administration of w/o-emulsified beta-LG prevented oral tolerance to beta-LG only when the beta-LG was contaminated with LPS. Conclusions: LPS contamination of an aqueous protein solution does not affect oral tolerance induction, whereas LPS present in emulsion prevents oral tolerance induction towards the food protein.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalInternational Archives of Allergy and Immunology
    Volume135
    Pages (from-to)216-220
    ISSN1018-2438
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

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