Light Robotics for Nanomedicine

Einstom Engay, Ada-Ioana Bunea, Andrew Rafael Bañas, Jesper Glückstad

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Technological developments from recent years have led to the emergence of a new field, Light Robotics1, which explores intelligent optical actuation of microfabricated structures with tailored properties. As one of the pioneers in the field, our group develops microrobots for biomedical applications and advanced light sculpting techniques for their efficient optical manipulation. Two-photon polymerization enables direct laser writing of structures with a resolution of ~200 nm, which can be further improved to ~10 nm by post-processing or additional control over the printing process. In combination with surface modification via metal deposition or chemical functionalization, such microstructures can be tailored to specific applications for biomedical research purposes, such as localized mixing in microfluidic channels2. Light sculpting using methods from the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) family allows precise, simultaneous control of several microstructures with six degrees of freedom. Light-controlled microrobots have already shown potential for biomedical research by e.g. local material delivery and mixing, indirect manipulation of biological samples or in situ sample characterization. Our group focuses on further improving the fabrication process by bringing the microrobots closer to the nanoscale or by integrating multiple surface chemistries providing e.g. stealth, biological targetting or drug delivery functionalities. This would expand the applications of the 3D-printed microrobots, particularly for the manipulation and characterization of biological samples, bringing them a step closer towards becoming true ”microsurgeons”.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2018
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2018
EventCopenhagen Nanomedicine Day 2018 - Mærsk Tower, Copenhagen, Denmark
Duration: 29 Oct 201829 Oct 2018

Conference

ConferenceCopenhagen Nanomedicine Day 2018
LocationMærsk Tower
CountryDenmark
CityCopenhagen
Period29/10/201829/10/2018

Cite this

Engay, E., Bunea, A-I., Bañas, A. R., & Glückstad, J. (2018). Light Robotics for Nanomedicine. Paper presented at Copenhagen Nanomedicine Day 2018 , Copenhagen, Denmark.
Engay, Einstom ; Bunea, Ada-Ioana ; Bañas, Andrew Rafael ; Glückstad, Jesper. / Light Robotics for Nanomedicine. Paper presented at Copenhagen Nanomedicine Day 2018 , Copenhagen, Denmark.1 p.
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Engay, E, Bunea, A-I, Bañas, AR & Glückstad, J 2018, 'Light Robotics for Nanomedicine' Paper presented at Copenhagen Nanomedicine Day 2018 , Copenhagen, Denmark, 29/10/2018 - 29/10/2018, .

Light Robotics for Nanomedicine. / Engay, Einstom; Bunea, Ada-Ioana; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Glückstad, Jesper.

2018. Paper presented at Copenhagen Nanomedicine Day 2018 , Copenhagen, Denmark.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

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AU - Engay, Einstom

AU - Bunea, Ada-Ioana

AU - Bañas, Andrew Rafael

AU - Glückstad, Jesper

PY - 2018

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AB - Technological developments from recent years have led to the emergence of a new field, Light Robotics1, which explores intelligent optical actuation of microfabricated structures with tailored properties. As one of the pioneers in the field, our group develops microrobots for biomedical applications and advanced light sculpting techniques for their efficient optical manipulation. Two-photon polymerization enables direct laser writing of structures with a resolution of ~200 nm, which can be further improved to ~10 nm by post-processing or additional control over the printing process. In combination with surface modification via metal deposition or chemical functionalization, such microstructures can be tailored to specific applications for biomedical research purposes, such as localized mixing in microfluidic channels2. Light sculpting using methods from the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) family allows precise, simultaneous control of several microstructures with six degrees of freedom. Light-controlled microrobots have already shown potential for biomedical research by e.g. local material delivery and mixing, indirect manipulation of biological samples or in situ sample characterization. Our group focuses on further improving the fabrication process by bringing the microrobots closer to the nanoscale or by integrating multiple surface chemistries providing e.g. stealth, biological targetting or drug delivery functionalities. This would expand the applications of the 3D-printed microrobots, particularly for the manipulation and characterization of biological samples, bringing them a step closer towards becoming true ”microsurgeons”.

M3 - Paper

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Engay E, Bunea A-I, Bañas AR, Glückstad J. Light Robotics for Nanomedicine. 2018. Paper presented at Copenhagen Nanomedicine Day 2018 , Copenhagen, Denmark.