Keep on cruising: Changes in lifestyle and driving style among male drivers between the age of 18 and 23

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    Abstract

    Despite recent improvements in general road safety levels, young male drivers in most western countries continue to be overrepresented in road traffic accidents. Lifestyle related motivational factors are a key element in the young male driver problem. Based on 379 posted questionnaires completed by the same male drivers at the age of 18 and again at the age of 23, this study examined changes in the relationship between lifestyle and driving style over a 5 year period. A number of changes in car use, driving style and engagement in different leisure time activities were found. Cruising was related to an extrovert social life as well as problem behaviours such as drink driving. At the age of 18 cruising was a part of the normal social life of the majority of the participants. However, while most drivers reduced their level of cruising as well as related problem behaviour over time, a smaller group still showed a similar life style at the age of 23. The study confirmed the importance of lifestyle related motivational factors for driving behaviour among young drivers. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalTransportation Research. Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour
    Volume20
    Pages (from-to)59-69
    ISSN1369-8478
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013

    Keywords

    • Highway accidents
    • Highway traffic control
    • Motor transportation
    • Surveys
    • Behavioral research

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