Is there sufficient ‘sink’ in current bioaccessibility determinations of organic pollutants in soils?

C.D. Collins, M. Mosquera-Vazquez, J.L. Gomez-Eyles, Philipp Mayer, V. Gouliarmou, F. Blum

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Bioaccessibility tests can be used to improve contaminated land risk assessments. For organic pollutants a 'sink' is required within these tests to better mimic their desorption under the physiological conditions prevailing in the intestinal tract, where a steep diffusion gradient for the removal of organic pollutants from the soil matrix would exist. This is currently ignored in most PBET systems. By combining the CEPBET bioaccessibility test with an infinite sink, the removal of PAH from spiked solutions was monitored. Less than 10% of spiked PAH remained in the stomach media after 1 h, 10% by 4 h in the small intestine compartment and c.15% after 16 h in the colon. The addition of the infinite sink increased bioaccessibility estimates for field soils by a factor of 1.2-2.8, confirming its importance for robust PBET tests. TOC or BC were not the only factors controlling desorption of the PAH from the soils. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume181
Pages (from-to)128-132
ISSN0269-7491
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bioaccessibility
  • Risk assessment
  • PBET
  • PAH
  • Soil carbon

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