Influence of temperature on growth and survival of juvenile winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus (Walbaum) reared under continuous light

Paul Casey, Vahid Zadmajid, Ian A. E. Butts, Sune Riis Sørensen, Matthew K. Litvak*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, has emerged as a promising candidate flatfish for cold‐water aquaculture and restocking. Here, juveniles were reared for 8  weeks at three temperatures: 10, 15, and 20°C under 24‐hr light. All fish were imaged at stocking and at 2‐week intervals, where growth was measured as changes in standard length (SL) and body area (BA). By week 2, fish reared at 15 and 20°C were larger than those grown at 10°C. At weeks 4 to 6, fish at 15°C were larger than fish at 20°C. Linear regressions were used to model growth dynamics over time at each temperature. Highly significant linear growth trajectories were detected over time for SL and BA. SL and BA regressions also showed a significant difference among the slopes across temperatures, where comparing slopes showed the best temperature to rear the flounder was 15°C. Weights of fish held at 15°C and 20°C were greater than at 10°C at the termination of the experiment. Within each temperature, the growth rate of malpigmented fish was not different from that of the normally pigmented fish. Overall, growth of winter flounder was comparable to that of other commercially produced flatfish species, providing strong evidence for this flatfish species as a potential species for aquaculture.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the World Aquaculture Society
Volume52
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)204-215
Number of pages12
ISSN0893-8849
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Aquaculture
  • Flatfish
  • Growth dynamic
  • Hatchery management
  • Metamorphosis

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