Inclusion of low-frequency cycles on tower fatigue lifetime assessment through relevant environmental and operational conditions

Bruno Rodrigues Faria*, Negin Sadeghi, Nikolay Dimitrov, Athanasios Kolios, Asger Bech Abrahamsen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) campaigns aiming at accurate consumed fatigue damage estimations play a pivotal role in the decision-making of wind turbines approaching their design lifetime. This study focuses on developing a sensor-based fatigue damage counting approach for wind turbines to calculate the consumed lifetime of the tower. The reliability of strain gauges for long-term operation is studied for an onshore V52 and an offshore turbine Adwen AD 5-116. Interestingly, the offshore strain gauges showed more variability compared to the onshore case. Moreover, an investigation on the coupling of low-frequency fatigue damage (LFFD) with Environmental and Operations Conditions (EOCs) through damage matrices highlighted that not only wind speed variability but varying operational conditions of a turbine increase tower fatigue consumption and should be accounted for in the design phase and optimized operational strategies aiming at lifetime extension.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Science of Making Torque from Wind (TORQUE 2024): Measurement and testing
Number of pages10
PublisherIOP Publishing
Publication date2024
Article number042021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024
EventThe Science of Making Torque from Wind (TORQUE 2024) - Florence, Italy
Duration: 29 May 202431 May 2024

Conference

ConferenceThe Science of Making Torque from Wind (TORQUE 2024)
Country/TerritoryItaly
CityFlorence
Period29/05/202431/05/2024
SeriesJournal of Physics: Conference Series
Number4
Volume2767
ISSN1742-6588

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