Immunity induced shortly after DNA vaccination of rainbow trout against rhabdoviruses protects against heterologous virus but not against bacterial pathogens

Niels Lorenzen, Ellen Lorenzen, Katja Einer-Jensen, Scott E. LaPatra

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    It was recently reported that DNA vaccination of rainbow trout fingerlings against viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) induced protection within 8 days after intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA. In order to analyse the specificity of this early immunity, fish were vaccinated with plasmid DNA encoding the VHSV or the infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) glycoprotein genes and later challenged with homologous or heterologous pathogens. Challenge experiments revealed that immunity established shortly after vaccination was cross-protective between the two viral pathogens whereas no increased survival was found upon challenge with bacterial pathogens. Within two months after vaccination, the cross-protection disappeared while the specific immunity to homologous virus remained high. The early immunity induced by the DNA vaccines thus appeared to involve short-lived non-specific anti-viral defence mechanisms.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalDevelopmental and Comparative Immunology
    Volume26
    Issue number2
    Pages (from-to)173-179
    ISSN0145-305X
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2002

    Keywords

    • genetic immunization
    • plasmid DNA
    • rhabdovirus
    • non-specific protection
    • glycoprotein
    • rainbow trout

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