Identifying the effect of vancomycin on health care-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains using bacteriological and physiological media

Akanksha Rajput, Saugat Poudel, Hannah Tsunemoto, Michael Meehan, Richard Szubin, Connor A. Olson, Yara Seif, Anne Lamsa, Nicholas Dillon, Alison Vrbanac, Joseph Sugie, Samira Dahesh, Jonathan M. Monk, Pieter C. Dorrestein, Rob Knight, Joe Pogliano, Victor Nizet, Adam M. Feist, Bernhard O. Palsson*

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Background: The evolving antibiotic-resistant behavior of health care-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) USA100 strains are of major concern. They are resistant to a broad class of antibiotics such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and many more. Findings: The selection of appropriate antibiotic susceptibility examination media is very important. Thus, we use bacteriological (cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth) as well as physiological (R10LB) media to determine the effect of vancomycin on USA100 strains. The study includes the profiling behavior of HA-MRSA USA100 D592 and D712 strains in the presence of vancomycin through various high-throughput assays. The US100 D592 and D712 strains were characterized at sub-inhibitory concentrations through growth curves, RNA sequencing, bacterial cytological profiling, and exo-metabolomics high throughput experiments. Conclusions: The study reveals the vancomycin resistance behavior of HA-MRSA USA100 strains in dual media conditions using wide-ranging experiments.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbergiaa156
JournalGigaScience
Volume10
Issue number1
Number of pages8
ISSN2047-217X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2021

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