Hybridisation of short DNA molecules investigated with in situ atomic force microscopy

Maria Holmberg, A. Kuhle, J. Garnaes, Anja Boisen

    Research output: Contribution to journalConference articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    By introducing the complementary DNA (cDNA) strand to a molecular layer of short single stranded DNA (ssDNA), immobilised on a gold surface, we have investigated hybridisation between the two DNA strands through the technique of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Before introduction of cDNA, the ssDNA molecular layer was modulated with the spacer molecule mercaptohexanol (MCH), which makes the ssDNA molecules more accessible for hybridisation.

    With in situ AFM, we have monitored the formation of a smooth, mixed molecular layer containing ssDNA and MCH. Furthermore, the hybridisation between the two DNA strands has been studied. Introduction of the cDNA strand resulted in an increase in smoothness and thickness of the molecular layer. Both the increase in order and thickness of the molecular layer can be expected if hybridisation occurs, since double stranded DNA molecules have a more rigid and elongated structure than ssDNA molecules. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalUltramicroscopy
    Volume97
    Issue number1-4
    Pages (from-to)257-261
    ISSN0304-3991
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2003
    EventFourth International Conference on Scanning Probe Microscopy, Sensors and Nanostructures - Las Vegas, NV, United States
    Duration: 26 May 200229 May 2002
    Conference number: 4

    Conference

    ConferenceFourth International Conference on Scanning Probe Microscopy, Sensors and Nanostructures
    Number4
    Country/TerritoryUnited States
    CityLas Vegas, NV
    Period26/05/200229/05/2002

    Keywords

    • Atomic force microscopy
    • Hybridisation
    • DNA molecular layers
    • Spacer molecules

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