How Managers’ Shared Mental models of Business-Customer Interaction Influence Managers’ Sensemaking of Social Media

Pernille Rydén, Torsten Ringberg, Ricky Wilke

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Building on empirical research, we identify four mental models of business–customer interactions and show how each uniquely affects howmanagers conceptualize and use social media. The four models are “business-to-customers,” “business-from-customers,” “business-withcustomers,”and “business-for-customers.” The mental model approach helps explain why managers' use of social media does not necessarily lead to radical changes in their interaction with customers, despite the opportunities facilitated by these media. We provide a conceptual framework that enables managers to introspectively investigate their own mental models and thereby revise their sensemaking and use of social media.© 2015 Direct Marketing Educational Foundation, Inc., dba Marketing EDGE.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Interactive Marketing
Volume31
Pages (from-to)1-17
ISSN1094-9968
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Mental models
  • Cultural models
  • Business–customer interaction
  • Social media
  • Marketing
  • Management
  • Cognition
  • Sensemaking
  • ZMET
  • SMSM

Cite this

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abstract = "Building on empirical research, we identify four mental models of business–customer interactions and show how each uniquely affects howmanagers conceptualize and use social media. The four models are “business-to-customers,” “business-from-customers,” “business-withcustomers,”and “business-for-customers.” The mental model approach helps explain why managers' use of social media does not necessarily lead to radical changes in their interaction with customers, despite the opportunities facilitated by these media. We provide a conceptual framework that enables managers to introspectively investigate their own mental models and thereby revise their sensemaking and use of social media.{\circledC} 2015 Direct Marketing Educational Foundation, Inc., dba Marketing EDGE.",
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How Managers’ Shared Mental models of Business-Customer Interaction Influence Managers’ Sensemaking of Social Media. / Rydén, Pernille; Ringberg, Torsten; Wilke, Ricky.

In: Journal of Interactive Marketing, Vol. 31, 2015, p. 1-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - How Managers’ Shared Mental models of Business-Customer Interaction Influence Managers’ Sensemaking of Social Media

AU - Rydén, Pernille

AU - Ringberg, Torsten

AU - Wilke, Ricky

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Building on empirical research, we identify four mental models of business–customer interactions and show how each uniquely affects howmanagers conceptualize and use social media. The four models are “business-to-customers,” “business-from-customers,” “business-withcustomers,”and “business-for-customers.” The mental model approach helps explain why managers' use of social media does not necessarily lead to radical changes in their interaction with customers, despite the opportunities facilitated by these media. We provide a conceptual framework that enables managers to introspectively investigate their own mental models and thereby revise their sensemaking and use of social media.© 2015 Direct Marketing Educational Foundation, Inc., dba Marketing EDGE.

AB - Building on empirical research, we identify four mental models of business–customer interactions and show how each uniquely affects howmanagers conceptualize and use social media. The four models are “business-to-customers,” “business-from-customers,” “business-withcustomers,”and “business-for-customers.” The mental model approach helps explain why managers' use of social media does not necessarily lead to radical changes in their interaction with customers, despite the opportunities facilitated by these media. We provide a conceptual framework that enables managers to introspectively investigate their own mental models and thereby revise their sensemaking and use of social media.© 2015 Direct Marketing Educational Foundation, Inc., dba Marketing EDGE.

KW - Mental models

KW - Cultural models

KW - Business–customer interaction

KW - Social media

KW - Marketing

KW - Management

KW - Cognition

KW - Sensemaking

KW - ZMET

KW - SMSM

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JO - Journal of Interactive Marketing

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SN - 1094-9968

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