How active ingredient localisation in plant tissues determines the targeted pest spectrum of different chemistries

Anke Buchholz, Stefan Trapp

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Abstract

BACKGROUND:
The efficacies of four commercial insecticides and of two research compounds were tested against aphids (Aphis craccivora and Myzus persicae), whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci) and red-spotted spider mites (Tetranychus urticae) in intrinsic (oral administration), curative (direct contact spray) and translaminar (arthropods infested on untreated leaf underside) assays. With a new translaminar model, the transport across the leaf cuticle and tissues and the electrochemical distribution of test compounds in cellular compartments and apoplast were calculated.
RESULTS:
The comparison of both information sets revealed that the intracellular localisation of active ingredients determines the performance of test compounds against different target pests because of different feeding behaviours: mites feed on mesophyll, and aphids and whiteflies mostly in the vascular system. Polar compounds have a slow adsorption into leaf cells and thus a favourable distribution into apoplast and xylem sap. Slightly lipophilic bases get trapped in vacuoles, which is a less suited place to control hemipteran pests but appropriate to control mites. Non-favourable cellular localisation led to a strong reduction in translaminar efficacy against phloem feeders.
CONCLUSION:
Prediction and optimisation of intracellular localisation of pesticides add valuable new information for targeted bioavailability and can indicate directions for improved pesticide design. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPest Management Science
Volume72
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)929–939
Number of pages11
ISSN1526-498X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Pesticide design
  • Intracellular localisation
  • Vacuole trapping
  • Translaminar
  • Aphide
  • Whitefly
  • Mites

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