High-Resolution Geological Information from Crosshole Ground Penetrating Radar in Clayey Tills

Bolette B. Jensen*, Louise Rosenberg, Aikaterini Tsitonaki, Nina Tuxen, Poul L. Bjerg, Lars Nielsen, Thomas M. Hansen, Majken C. Looms

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Heterogeneous glacial deposits dominate large parts of the Northern Hemisphere. In these landscapes, high-resolution characterization of the geology is crucial for understanding contaminant transport. Geological information is mostly obtained from multiple boreholes drilled during a site investigation, but such point-based data alone do not always provide the required resolution to map small-scale heterogeneity between boreholes. Crosshole ground penetrating radar (GPR) is suggested as a tool for adding credible geological information between boreholes at contaminated site investigations in industrial sites where infrastructure, such as electrical installations, can pose a challenge to other geophysical methods. GPR data are sensitive to the dielectric permittivity and the bulk electrical conductivity, which can be related to the distribution of water content and sand/clay occurrences. Here we present a detailed crosshole GPR dataset collected at an industrial contaminated site in a clay till setting. The data are processed using a novel inversion approach where information on changes in the velocity and attenuation of the radar signal are obtained independently. The GPR results are compared to borehole logs, grain size analyses, and relative permeability data from the site. The GPR data analysis provided valuable information on the understanding of the lateral geological variability. A silt layer with a thickness of a few decimeters, likely important for flow characterization, was confirmed and resolved by GPR data. Our findings suggest that crosshole GPR has the potential for contributing with high-resolution geological information by filling the data gap between boreholes, thereby becoming a relevant tool in contaminated site investigations.
Original languageEnglish
JournalGround Water Monitoring and Remediation
Volume43
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)55-66
Number of pages12
ISSN1069-3629
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

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