Heat savings and heat generation technologies: Modelling of residential investment behaviour with local health costs

Erika Zvingilaite, Henrik Klinge Jacobsen

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    Abstract

    The trade-off between investing in energy savings and investing in individual heating technologies with high investment and low variable costs in single family houses is modelled for a number of building and consumer categories in Denmark. For each group the private economic cost of providing heating comfort is minimised. The private solution may deviate from the socio-economical optimal solution and we suggest changes to policy to incentivise the individuals to make choices more in line with the socio-economic optimal mix of energy savings and technologies.

    The households can combine their primary heating source with secondary heating e.g. a woodstove. This choice results in increased indoor air pollution with fine particles causing health effects. We integrate health cost due to use of woodstoves into household optimisation of heating expenditures.

    The results show that due to a combination of low costs of primary fuel and low environmental performance of woodstoves today, included health costs lead to decreased use of secondary heating. Overall the interdependence of heat generation technology- and heat saving-choice is significant. The total optimal level of heat savings for private consumers decrease by 66% when all have the option to shift to the technology with lowest variable costs. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All Rights reserved
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalEnergy Policy
    Volume77
    Pages (from-to)31–45
    ISSN0301-4215
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

    Keywords

    • Energy savings
    • Externalities
    • Modelling
    • Residential heating
    • Rebound

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