Healthy puppies and kittens as carriers of Campylobacter spp., with special reference to Campylobacter upsaliensis

Birthe Hald, Mogens Madsen

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Living in a household with a dog or cat has previously been identified as a significant risk factor for acquiring campylobacteriosis, in particular, with reference to Campylobacter upsaliensis infection. In a cross-sectional study carried out in Denmark between August and December 1996, 72 healthy puppies and 42 healthy kittens, aged between 11 and 17 weeks, were sampled for fecal campylobacter shedding by culture of rectal swab specimens on blood-free agar base with cefoperazone at 32 mg/liter and amphotericin at 10 mg/liter and on blood-free agar base with cefoperazone at 8 mg/liter, teicoplanin at 4 mg/liter, and amphotericin at 10 mg/liter, Additionally, with respect to the C. upsaliensis transmission potential of poultry, a chicken cloacal swab sample from each of 100 different broiler flocks was included in the study for comparison, We found 21 (29%) of the puppies positive for Campylobacter spp., with a species distribution of 76% C. jejuni, 5% C. coli, and 19% C. upsaliensis, Of the kittens examined, two (5%) excreted campylobacters; both strains were C. upsaliensis, None of the chicken samples examined were found to be positive for C. upsaliensis. We concluded that young puppies and kittens are potential transmitters of human-pathogenic Campylobacter spp., including C. upsaliensis, while poultry seems negligible in C. upsaliensis epidemiology.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
    Volume35
    Issue number12
    Pages (from-to)3351-3352
    ISSN0095-1137
    Publication statusPublished - 1997

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