Global Collective Dose Commitments from Release of Long-Lived Radionuclides

H. L. Gjørup

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearch

    Abstract

    The concept of global collective dose commitment as a measure of total detriment from the release of radioactivity to the environment is outlined. Estimates are given of global collective dose commitments resulting from the release of 14C and uranium daughter products from the nuclear fuel cycle. Comparisons are made with similar estimates of global collective dose commitments resulting from the use of fossil fuels and certain fertilizers due to their content of uranium and its daughter products. In the case of long-lived radionuclides that remain in circulation in the biosphere, it is shown that the use of global collective dose commitments in differential cost-benefit analysis can lead to questionable results. In differential cost-benefit analysis it is suggested that population exposures should not simply be integrated irrespective of their time of occurrence, but that a certain discount rate should be applied for future doses. This suggestion is examined
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationNuclear Power and Its Fuel Cycle
    Place of PublicationVienna
    PublisherInternational Atomic Energy Agency
    Publication date1977
    Pages303-316
    Publication statusPublished - 1977
    EventInternational Conference on Nuclear Power and Its Fuel Cycle - Salzburg, 2-13 May
    Duration: 1 Jan 1977 → …

    Conference

    ConferenceInternational Conference on Nuclear Power and Its Fuel Cycle
    CitySalzburg, 2-13 May
    Period01/01/1977 → …

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