Future Atmospheric CO2 Concentration and Environmental Consequences for the Feed Market: a Consequential LCA

Henrik Saxe, Lorie Hamelin, Torben Hinrichsen, Henrik Wenzel

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    With the rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration [CO2], crops will assimilate more carbon. This will increase yields in terms of carbohydrates but dilute the content of protein and minerals in crops. This consequential life cycle assessment study modelled the environmental consequences that such altered chemical composition and crop yields would have for the production of pig feed. Results revealed, among others, that an extra European demand of pig feed under an atmospheric [CO2] of 550 μmole mole-1 would lead to ca. 6% less expansion of additional arable land worldwide, in comparison to feed produced under today’s conditions. However, this did not translate into lower greenhouse gas emissions, because the benefit of increased crop yield was counteracted by changes in the composition of the feed formulation. Among the important changes, feed produced under high [CO2] was shown to integrate 23% more soymeal and 5% less wheat than at present.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the 9th International Conference on Life Cycle Assessment in the Agri-Food Sector
    EditorsRita Schenck, Douglas Huizenga
    PublisherACLCA
    Publication date2014
    Pages1194-1202
    ISBN (Print)978-0-9882145-7-6
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    Event9th International Conference on Life Cycle Assessment in the Agri-food Sector - San Francisco, United States
    Duration: 8 Oct 201410 Oct 2014

    Conference

    Conference9th International Conference on Life Cycle Assessment in the Agri-food Sector
    Country/TerritoryUnited States
    CitySan Francisco
    Period08/10/201410/10/2014

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