Frequency modulation excursion and rate discrimination in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners

Isabel Schindwolf, Marianna Vatti, Sébastien Santurette

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearch

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Abstract

Most natural sounds contain frequency fluctuations over time such as changes in their fundamental frequency, non-periodic speech formant transitions, or periodic fluctuations like musical vibrato. These are sometimes characterized as frequency modulation (FM) with a given excursion (FMe) and rate (FMr) (Fig.1). Accurate
processing of FM may play an important role in music and speech perception, especially in complex instrument or talker situations. While age and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) can affect FM detection thresholds [1,2] and SNHL can affect the range of FMe and FMr values producing a sung vowel percept (Fig.2) [3], less is known about how these factors affect FMe and FMr discrimination. Moreover, reference data for FM discrimination in normal-hearing (NH) listeners remains scarce [4-6]. As discrimination tasks are closer to what listeners may use in real-life situations, this study investigated the effects of age and SNHL on FMe and FMr difference limens (DLs) for reference values typical of frequency fluctuations observed in speech and music signals.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2018
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Event41st Midwinter Meeting of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology - Manchester Grand Hyatt, San Diego, United States
Duration: 10 Feb 201814 Feb 2018
Conference number: 41

Conference

Conference41st Midwinter Meeting of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology
Number41
LocationManchester Grand Hyatt
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Diego
Period10/02/201814/02/2018

Bibliographical note

Published abstract and presented poster at 41st MidWinter Meeting of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, February 9-14, 2018, San Diego, CA — Abstract #PS 375.

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