Foraging mode and prey size spectra of suspension-feeding copepods and other zooplankton

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Prey size spectra of suspension-feeding zooplankton may be predicted from foraging mode and a mechanistic understanding of prey perception and capture. I examine this for suspension-feeding copepods where 2 foraging modes can be distinguished: ambush feeding and active (i.e. cruising and feeding-current) feeding. Prey perception mechanisms differ between the 2 foraging modes. I use simple arguments to predict that the ambush strategy targets larger prey and has a narrower prey size spectrum than the cruising and feeding-current feeding strategies. I compile data from the literature that confirm the prediction. I also make qualitative predictions of food size spectra in zooplankton with other prey perception mechanisms that accord with observations.
Original languageEnglish
Book seriesMarine Ecology Progress Series
Volume558
Pages (from-to)15-20
ISSN1616-1599
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • ECOLOGY
  • MARINE
  • OCEANOGRAPHY
  • PLANKTON
  • SELECTIVITY
  • PERCEPTION
  • MECHANISMS
  • MORPHOLOGY
  • PATTERNS
  • CAPTURE
  • SIGNALS
  • GROWTH
  • RATES
  • Prey perception mechanism
  • Prey capture mechanism
  • Pelagic tunicates
  • Heterotrophic flagellates
  • Dinoflagellates
  • Cladocerans

Cite this

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title = "Foraging mode and prey size spectra of suspension-feeding copepods and other zooplankton",
abstract = "Prey size spectra of suspension-feeding zooplankton may be predicted from foraging mode and a mechanistic understanding of prey perception and capture. I examine this for suspension-feeding copepods where 2 foraging modes can be distinguished: ambush feeding and active (i.e. cruising and feeding-current) feeding. Prey perception mechanisms differ between the 2 foraging modes. I use simple arguments to predict that the ambush strategy targets larger prey and has a narrower prey size spectrum than the cruising and feeding-current feeding strategies. I compile data from the literature that confirm the prediction. I also make qualitative predictions of food size spectra in zooplankton with other prey perception mechanisms that accord with observations.",
keywords = "ECOLOGY, MARINE, OCEANOGRAPHY, PLANKTON, SELECTIVITY, PERCEPTION, MECHANISMS, MORPHOLOGY, PATTERNS, CAPTURE, SIGNALS, GROWTH, RATES, Prey perception mechanism, Prey capture mechanism, Pelagic tunicates, Heterotrophic flagellates, Dinoflagellates, Cladocerans",
author = "Thomas Ki{\o}rboe",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.3354/meps11877",
language = "English",
volume = "558",
pages = "15--20",
journal = "Marine Ecology - Progress Series Online",
issn = "1616-1599",
publisher = "Inter Research",

}

Foraging mode and prey size spectra of suspension-feeding copepods and other zooplankton. / Kiørboe, Thomas.

In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, Vol. 558, 2016, p. 15-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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PY - 2016

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AB - Prey size spectra of suspension-feeding zooplankton may be predicted from foraging mode and a mechanistic understanding of prey perception and capture. I examine this for suspension-feeding copepods where 2 foraging modes can be distinguished: ambush feeding and active (i.e. cruising and feeding-current) feeding. Prey perception mechanisms differ between the 2 foraging modes. I use simple arguments to predict that the ambush strategy targets larger prey and has a narrower prey size spectrum than the cruising and feeding-current feeding strategies. I compile data from the literature that confirm the prediction. I also make qualitative predictions of food size spectra in zooplankton with other prey perception mechanisms that accord with observations.

KW - ECOLOGY

KW - MARINE

KW - OCEANOGRAPHY

KW - PLANKTON

KW - SELECTIVITY

KW - PERCEPTION

KW - MECHANISMS

KW - MORPHOLOGY

KW - PATTERNS

KW - CAPTURE

KW - SIGNALS

KW - GROWTH

KW - RATES

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KW - Prey capture mechanism

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KW - Dinoflagellates

KW - Cladocerans

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