Fiber coupled ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

Ulrich Dieter Felix Keil, Jacob Riis Jensen, Jørn Märcher Hvam

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    Abstract

    We report on a scanning tunneling microscope with a photoconductive gate in the tunneling current circuit. The tunneling tip is attached to a coplanar transmission line with an integrated photoconductive switch. The switch is illuminated through a fiber which is rigidly attached to the switch substrate. By using a firmly attached fiber we achieve an excellent reproducibility and unconstrained positioning of the tip. We observe a transient signal with 2.9 ps pulse width in tunneling mode and 5 ps in contact mode. The instrument is applied to investigating the mode structure on a coplanar waveguide. The measurements show that the probe works as a transient voltage detector in contact and a capacitively coupled transient field detector in tunneling mode. We do not measure the transient voltage change in the ohmic tunneling current. In this sense, the spatial resolution for propagating electrical pulses is better in contact mode than in tunneling mode. ©1997 American Institute of Physics.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalJournal of Applied Physics
    Volume81
    Issue number7
    Pages (from-to)2929-2934
    ISSN0021-8979
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1997

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright (1997) American Institute of Physics. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the American Institute of Physics.

    Cite this

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix ; Jensen, Jacob Riis ; Hvam, Jørn Märcher. / Fiber coupled ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope. In: Journal of Applied Physics. 1997 ; Vol. 81, No. 7. pp. 2929-2934.
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    title = "Fiber coupled ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope",
    abstract = "We report on a scanning tunneling microscope with a photoconductive gate in the tunneling current circuit. The tunneling tip is attached to a coplanar transmission line with an integrated photoconductive switch. The switch is illuminated through a fiber which is rigidly attached to the switch substrate. By using a firmly attached fiber we achieve an excellent reproducibility and unconstrained positioning of the tip. We observe a transient signal with 2.9 ps pulse width in tunneling mode and 5 ps in contact mode. The instrument is applied to investigating the mode structure on a coplanar waveguide. The measurements show that the probe works as a transient voltage detector in contact and a capacitively coupled transient field detector in tunneling mode. We do not measure the transient voltage change in the ohmic tunneling current. In this sense, the spatial resolution for propagating electrical pulses is better in contact mode than in tunneling mode. {\circledC}1997 American Institute of Physics.",
    author = "Keil, {Ulrich Dieter Felix} and Jensen, {Jacob Riis} and Hvam, {J{\o}rn M{\"a}rcher}",
    note = "Copyright (1997) American Institute of Physics. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the American Institute of Physics.",
    year = "1997",
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    Fiber coupled ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope. / Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher.

    In: Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 81, No. 7, 1997, p. 2929-2934.

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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    T1 - Fiber coupled ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    AU - Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix

    AU - Jensen, Jacob Riis

    AU - Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    N1 - Copyright (1997) American Institute of Physics. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the American Institute of Physics.

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    Y1 - 1997

    N2 - We report on a scanning tunneling microscope with a photoconductive gate in the tunneling current circuit. The tunneling tip is attached to a coplanar transmission line with an integrated photoconductive switch. The switch is illuminated through a fiber which is rigidly attached to the switch substrate. By using a firmly attached fiber we achieve an excellent reproducibility and unconstrained positioning of the tip. We observe a transient signal with 2.9 ps pulse width in tunneling mode and 5 ps in contact mode. The instrument is applied to investigating the mode structure on a coplanar waveguide. The measurements show that the probe works as a transient voltage detector in contact and a capacitively coupled transient field detector in tunneling mode. We do not measure the transient voltage change in the ohmic tunneling current. In this sense, the spatial resolution for propagating electrical pulses is better in contact mode than in tunneling mode. ©1997 American Institute of Physics.

    AB - We report on a scanning tunneling microscope with a photoconductive gate in the tunneling current circuit. The tunneling tip is attached to a coplanar transmission line with an integrated photoconductive switch. The switch is illuminated through a fiber which is rigidly attached to the switch substrate. By using a firmly attached fiber we achieve an excellent reproducibility and unconstrained positioning of the tip. We observe a transient signal with 2.9 ps pulse width in tunneling mode and 5 ps in contact mode. The instrument is applied to investigating the mode structure on a coplanar waveguide. The measurements show that the probe works as a transient voltage detector in contact and a capacitively coupled transient field detector in tunneling mode. We do not measure the transient voltage change in the ohmic tunneling current. In this sense, the spatial resolution for propagating electrical pulses is better in contact mode than in tunneling mode. ©1997 American Institute of Physics.

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