Exploring the role of intermediaries in firm-user community collaborations: resolving or multiplying conflicts?

Ghita Dragsdahl Lauritzen

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Research on user innovation shows that innovation can be impeded by the conflicting demands that arise in the context of collaborations between firms and their user communities. Studies argue that intermediary organizations can help to resolve these conflicts, by bridging the opposing logics in which they originate. Nevertheless, despite its popularity there is still a paucity of studies on intermediaries mediating firm-community collaboration. On the basis of an embedded case study, this article suggests that instead of resolving conflicts, intermediaries create a new membership construct from which new tensions arise. I propose that if intermediary organizations foster a clearer view of this membership construct, the result can be an innovative synthesis of opposing logics. Thus, I suggest a novel approach to the debate about user innovation by arguing that mediating firm-community collaboration is not a matter of bridging opposing logics, but of managing new forms of membership uncertainty
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of 22nd Innovation Product Development Management Conference.
    Number of pages30
    Publication date2015
    Publication statusPublished - 2015
    Event22nd Innovation and Product Development Management Conference - Copenhagen, Denmark
    Duration: 14 Jun 201516 Jun 2015
    Conference number: 22

    Conference

    Conference22nd Innovation and Product Development Management Conference
    Number22
    CountryDenmark
    CityCopenhagen
    Period14/06/201516/06/2015

    Bibliographical note

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