Experiments for possible hydroacoustic discrimination of free-swimming juvenile gadoid fish by analysis of broadband pulse spectra as well as 3D fish position form video images and split beam acoustics

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Abstract

Measurements were made of the broad-bandwidth (80–220 kHz) acoustic backscattering from free-swimming juvenile gadoids at various orientations and positions in an acoustic beam, under controlled conditions. The experimental apparatus consisted of a stereo-video camera system, a broad-bandwidth echosounder and echo-processor system, a narrowband 120 kHz split-beam echosounder, a large tank, and a fishnet cage. The net cage was centred on the acoustic beams and was virtually transparent, both acoustically and optically. Accurate three-dimensional positions and angular orientations of individual fish were estimated from stereo-images captured synchronously when broad-bandwidth echoes were received from passing fish. Fish positions were also estimated from data collected with a synchronized split-beam echosounder. Software was developed for image analysis and modelling, including calibration, alignment of acoustic and optical-reference frames, and automatic position-fitting of fish models to manually marked fix-points on fish images. The software also performs Fourier spectrum analysis and pulse-shape analysis of broad-bandwidth echoes. Therefore, several measurement series on free-swimming juvenile gadoids were evaluated. The method and data may be used to improve the acoustic identification of fish species and sizes, and thereby improve investigations of spatial prey–predator relationships, and the accuracy and efficiency of acoustic surveys.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBioacoustics - the International Journal of Animal Sound and its Recording
Volume12
Issue number2-3
Pages (from-to)297-299
ISSN0952-4622
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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