Experimental measurement and modeling of the rate of absorption of carbon dioxide by aqueous ammonia

Victor Camille Alfred Darde, Willy J.M. van Well, Philip Loldrup Fosbøl, Erling Halfdan Stenby, Kaj Thomsen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In this work, the rate of absorption of carbon dioxide by aqueous ammonia solvent has been studied by applying a newly built wetted wall column. The absorption rate in aqueous ammonia was measured at temperatures from 279 to 304K for 1 to 10wt% aqueous ammonia with loadings varying from 0 to 0.8molCO2/molNH3. The absorption rate in 30wt% aqueous mono-ethanolamine (MEA) was measured at 294 and 314K with loadings varying from 0 to 0.4 as comparison.It was found that at 304K, the rate of absorption of carbon dioxide by 10wt% NH3 solvent was comparable to the rates for 30wt% MEA at 294 and 314K (a typical absorption temperature for this process). The absorption rate using ammonia was however significantly lower at temperatures of 294K and lower as applied in the Chilled Ammonia Process. However, at these low temperatures, the rate of absorption in ammonia has only a small temperature dependency.The rate of absorption decreases strongly with decreasing ammonia concentrations and increasing CO2 loadings.The rate of absorption of carbon dioxide by aqueous ammonia solvent was modeled using the measurements of the unloaded solutions and the zwitter-ion mechanism. The model could successfully predict the experimental measurements of the absorption rate of CO2 in loaded ammonia solutions.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Volume5
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)1149-1162
ISSN1750-5836
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Aqueous ammonia
  • Wetted wall
  • Carbon dioxide capture
  • CO2
  • NH3
  • Carbon dioxide
  • Absorption rate
  • Chilled ammonia

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