Exchange-bias in amorphous ferromagnetic and polycrystalline antiferromagnetic bilayers: Structural study and micromagnetic modeling

A. Kohn, J. Dean, András Kovács, A. Zeltser, M. J. Carey, D. Geiger, G. Hrkac, T. Schrefl, D. Allwood

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

We study the role of the structure of antiferromagnetic polycrystalline metallic films in determining the magnetic properties of an exchange-coupled amorphous ferromagnetic layer. The bilayers are sputter-deposited, highly textured {111} Ir22Mn78 and Co65.5Fe14.5B20 thin films. We focus on structural characterization of Ir22Mn78 as a function of layer thickness in the range having the strongest influence over the exchange-bias field and training effect. We have used transmission electron microscopy to characterize defects in the form of interface steps and roughness, interdiffusion, twin-and grain-boundaries. Such defects can result in uncompensated magnetic spins in the antiferromagnet, which then contribute to exchange-bias. These experimental results form the basis of a general model, which uses finite element micromagnetic simulations. The model incorporates the experimental structural parameters of the bilayer by implementing a surface integral technique that allows numerical calculations to solve the transition from an amorphous to a granular structure. As a result, a detailed calculation of the underlying magnetic structure within the antiferromagnetic material is achieved. These calculations are in good agreement with micromagnetic imaging using Lorentz transmission electron microscopy and the macro-magnetic properties of these bilayers. (C) 2011 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3559261]
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Applied Physics
Volume109
Issue number8
Pages (from-to)083924
ISSN0021-8979
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

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