Evaluation of a Modified High-Definition Electrode Montage for Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS) of Pre-Central Areas

Kirstin Friederike Heise, Nick Kortzorg, Guilherme Bicalho Saturnino, Hakuei Fujiyama, Koen Cuypers, Axel Thielscher, Stephan P. Swinnen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate a modified electrode montage with respect to its effect on tACS-dependent modulation of corticospinal excitability and discomfort caused by neurosensory side effects accompanying stimulation. Methods: In a double-blind cross-over design, the classical electrode montage for primary motor cortex (M1) stimulation (two patch electrodes over M1 and contralateral supraorbital area) was compared with an M1 centre-ring montage. Corticospinal excitability was evaluated before, during, immediately after and 15 minutes after tACS (10 min., 20 Hz vs. 30 s low-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation). Results: Corticospinal excitability increased significantly during and immediately after tACS with the centre-ring montage. This was not the case with the classical montage or tRNS stimulation. Level of discomfort was rated on average lower with the centre-ring montage. Conclusions: In comparison to the classic montage, the M1 centre-ring montage enables a more focal stimulation of the target area and, at the same time, significantly reduces neurosensory side effects, essential for placebo-controlled study designs.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBrain Stimulation
Volume9
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)700–704
Number of pages5
ISSN1935-861X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Neurology (clinical)
  • Neuroscience (all)
  • Biophysics
  • Beta frequency
  • Corticospinal excitability
  • High-density electrode montage
  • Neurosensory effects
  • Transcranial alternating current stimulation

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