Emulsifier peptides derived from seaweed, methanotrophic bacteria, and potato proteins identified by quantitative proteomics and bioinformatics

Betül Yesiltas*, Simon Gregersen, Linea Lægsgaard, Maja L. Brinch, Tobias H. Olsen, Paolo Marcatili, Michael T. Overgaard, Egon B. Hansen, Charlotte Jacobsen, Pedro J. García-Moreno*

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Global focus on sustainability has accelerated research into alternative non-animal sources of food protein and functional food ingredients. Amphiphilic peptides represent a class of promising biomolecules to replace chemical emulsifiers in food emulsions. In contrast to traditional trial-and-error enzymatic hydrolysis, this study utilizes a bottom-up approach combining quantitative proteomics, bioinformatics prediction, and functional validation to identify novel emulsifier peptides from seaweed, methanotrophic bacteria, and potatoes. In vitro functional validation reveal that all protein sources contained embedded novel emulsifier peptides comparable to or better than sodium caseinate (CAS). Thus, peptides efficiently reduced oil-water interfacial tension and generated physically stable emulsions with higher net zeta potential and smaller droplet sizes than CAS. In silico structure modelling provided further insight on peptide structure and the link to emulsifying potential. This study clearly demonstrates the potential and broad applicability of the bottom-up approach for identification of abundant and potent emulsifier peptides.
Original languageEnglish
Article number130217
JournalFood Chemistry
ISSN0308-8146
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

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