Emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from human beings: breath, skin and whole body characterizations

Nijing Wang*, Lisa Ernle, Gabriel Bekö, Pawel Wargocki, Jonathan Williams

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Human beings are a potent mobile source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the indoor environment. Several hundred VOCs are known to enter the air via breath and dermal emission (de Lacy Costello et al. 2014). Certain VOC species react rapidly with oxidants present in ambient air (e.g. ozone or OH radicals), producing multiple secondary VOCs, some of which have adverse effects on human health (Wolkoff et. al. 2013). VOC concentrations associated with human emissions have been reported from various indoor environments using online and offline techniques (Stönner et.
al., 2018, He et. al. 2019). However, a comprehensive chemical characterization of human emission rates as a function of ozone is lacking. This study is a part of the Indoor Chemical Human Emissions and Reactivity (ICHEAR) project, which attempts to quantify the emission rates of human VOCs from breath, skin and whole body under controlled conditions.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2020
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Event 16th Conference of the International Society of Indoor Air Quality & Climate - Online
Duration: 1 Nov 20204 Nov 2020
Conference number: 16

Conference

Conference 16th Conference of the International Society of Indoor Air Quality & Climate
Number16
LocationOnline
Period01/11/202004/11/2020

Bibliographical note

Paper ID ABS-0261

Keywords

  • Indoor air chemistry
  • Human emission
  • Ozone
  • PTR-MS

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