Effects of salt and storage temperature on chemical microbiological and sensory changes in cold-smoked salmon

Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen, T. Gill, Hans Henrik Huss

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Chemical, microbiological and sensory changes during storage of vacuum-packed cold-smoked salmon were studied using a factorial experimental design with two storage temperatures (5 and 10 degrees C) and two salt levels (2.2 and 4.6%). The spoilage characteristics were typical of microbiological activity in all treatments, but there was no relation between sensory changes and any of the microbiological numbers (total viable counts, total psychrotrophes, lactic acid bacteria or Enterobacteriaceae). Total viable counts typically reached 10(8) cfu/g weeks before sensory rejection. Acetic acid, hypoxanthine, trimethylamine and ethanol concentrations increased with storage time in all treatments. The increase in ethanol depended on salt concentration but not storage temperature. Absolute values of trimethylamine ranged from 2-8 mg TMA-N/100 g initially, to 10 mg TMA-N/100 g at sensory rejection. Acetic acid levels increased with temperature and decreased with salt concentration, but varied between 12-23 mu mol/g at rejection. Initial concentrations of hypoxanthine increased from 2-3 mu mol/g to maximum 8-9 mu mol/g, with values of 5-7 mu mol/g indicating the limit of sensory acceptability. Hypoxanthine was considered to be the best objective indicator for sensory quality of cold-smoked salmon.
Original languageEnglish
JournalFood Research International
Volume28
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)123-130
ISSN0963-9969
Publication statusPublished - 1995

Bibliographical note

J English Article QX125 HANSEN LT TECH UNIV DENMARK, DANISH MINIST FISHERIES, TECHNOL LAB, BLDG 221, DK-2800 LYNGBY, DENMARK FOOD RES INT

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