Effects of Hearing Loss and Fast-Acting Compression on Amplitude Modulation Perception and Speech Intelligibility

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article – Annual report year: 2018Researchpeer-review

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Effects of Hearing Loss and Fast-Acting Compression on Amplitude Modulation Perception and Speech Intelligibility. / Wiinberg, Alan; Jepsen, Morten Løve; Epp, Bastian; Dau, Torsten.

In: Ear and Hearing, 2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article – Annual report year: 2018Researchpeer-review

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@article{6d863fd219c34c6d9c2ba8906bdbfec8,
title = "Effects of Hearing Loss and Fast-Acting Compression on Amplitude Modulation Perception and Speech Intelligibility",
abstract = "Objective: The purpose was to investigate the effects of hearing-lossand fast-acting compression on speech intelligibility and two measuresof temporal modulation sensitivity.Design: Twelve adults with normal hearing (NH) and 16 adults with mildto moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss were tested. Amplitudemodulation detection and modulation-depth discrimination (MDD)thresholds with sinusoidal carriers of 1 or 5kHz and modulators in therange from 8 to 256 Hz were used as measures of temporal modulationsensitivity. Speech intelligibility was assessed by obtaining speechreception thresholds in stationary and fluctuating background noise. Allthresholds were obtained with and without compression (using a fixedcompression ratio of 2:1).Results: For modulation detection, the thresholds were similar or lowerfor the group with hearing loss than for the group with NH. In contrast,the MDD thresholds were higher for the group with hearing loss than forthe group with NH. Fast-acting compression increased the modulationdetection thresholds, while no effect of compression on the MDD thresholdswas observed. The speech reception thresholds obtained in stationarynoise were slightly increased in the compression condition relativeto the linear processing condition, whereas no difference in the speechreception thresholds obtained in fluctuating noise was observed. Forthe group with NH, individual differences in the MDD thresholds couldaccount for 72{\%} of the variability in the speech reception thresholdsobtained in stationary noise, whereas the correlation was insignificantfor the hearing-loss group.Conclusions: Fast-acting compression can restore modulation detectionthresholds for listeners with hearing loss to the values observed for listenerswith NH. Despite this normalization of the modulation detectionthresholds, compression does not seem to provide a benefit for speechintelligibility. Furthermore, fast-acting compression may not be able torestore MDD thresholds to the values observed for listeners with NH,suggesting that the two measures of amplitude modulation sensitivityrepresent different aspects of temporal processing. For listeners withNH, the ability to discriminate modulation depth was highly correlatedwith speech intelligibility in stationary noise.",
author = "Alan Wiinberg and Jepsen, {Morten L{\o}ve} and Bastian Epp and Torsten Dau",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1097/AUD.0000000000000589",
language = "English",
journal = "Ear and Hearing",
issn = "0196-0202",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of Hearing Loss and Fast-Acting Compression on Amplitude Modulation Perception and Speech Intelligibility

AU - Wiinberg, Alan

AU - Jepsen, Morten Løve

AU - Epp, Bastian

AU - Dau, Torsten

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Objective: The purpose was to investigate the effects of hearing-lossand fast-acting compression on speech intelligibility and two measuresof temporal modulation sensitivity.Design: Twelve adults with normal hearing (NH) and 16 adults with mildto moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss were tested. Amplitudemodulation detection and modulation-depth discrimination (MDD)thresholds with sinusoidal carriers of 1 or 5kHz and modulators in therange from 8 to 256 Hz were used as measures of temporal modulationsensitivity. Speech intelligibility was assessed by obtaining speechreception thresholds in stationary and fluctuating background noise. Allthresholds were obtained with and without compression (using a fixedcompression ratio of 2:1).Results: For modulation detection, the thresholds were similar or lowerfor the group with hearing loss than for the group with NH. In contrast,the MDD thresholds were higher for the group with hearing loss than forthe group with NH. Fast-acting compression increased the modulationdetection thresholds, while no effect of compression on the MDD thresholdswas observed. The speech reception thresholds obtained in stationarynoise were slightly increased in the compression condition relativeto the linear processing condition, whereas no difference in the speechreception thresholds obtained in fluctuating noise was observed. Forthe group with NH, individual differences in the MDD thresholds couldaccount for 72% of the variability in the speech reception thresholdsobtained in stationary noise, whereas the correlation was insignificantfor the hearing-loss group.Conclusions: Fast-acting compression can restore modulation detectionthresholds for listeners with hearing loss to the values observed for listenerswith NH. Despite this normalization of the modulation detectionthresholds, compression does not seem to provide a benefit for speechintelligibility. Furthermore, fast-acting compression may not be able torestore MDD thresholds to the values observed for listeners with NH,suggesting that the two measures of amplitude modulation sensitivityrepresent different aspects of temporal processing. For listeners withNH, the ability to discriminate modulation depth was highly correlatedwith speech intelligibility in stationary noise.

AB - Objective: The purpose was to investigate the effects of hearing-lossand fast-acting compression on speech intelligibility and two measuresof temporal modulation sensitivity.Design: Twelve adults with normal hearing (NH) and 16 adults with mildto moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss were tested. Amplitudemodulation detection and modulation-depth discrimination (MDD)thresholds with sinusoidal carriers of 1 or 5kHz and modulators in therange from 8 to 256 Hz were used as measures of temporal modulationsensitivity. Speech intelligibility was assessed by obtaining speechreception thresholds in stationary and fluctuating background noise. Allthresholds were obtained with and without compression (using a fixedcompression ratio of 2:1).Results: For modulation detection, the thresholds were similar or lowerfor the group with hearing loss than for the group with NH. In contrast,the MDD thresholds were higher for the group with hearing loss than forthe group with NH. Fast-acting compression increased the modulationdetection thresholds, while no effect of compression on the MDD thresholdswas observed. The speech reception thresholds obtained in stationarynoise were slightly increased in the compression condition relativeto the linear processing condition, whereas no difference in the speechreception thresholds obtained in fluctuating noise was observed. Forthe group with NH, individual differences in the MDD thresholds couldaccount for 72% of the variability in the speech reception thresholdsobtained in stationary noise, whereas the correlation was insignificantfor the hearing-loss group.Conclusions: Fast-acting compression can restore modulation detectionthresholds for listeners with hearing loss to the values observed for listenerswith NH. Despite this normalization of the modulation detectionthresholds, compression does not seem to provide a benefit for speechintelligibility. Furthermore, fast-acting compression may not be able torestore MDD thresholds to the values observed for listeners with NH,suggesting that the two measures of amplitude modulation sensitivityrepresent different aspects of temporal processing. For listeners withNH, the ability to discriminate modulation depth was highly correlatedwith speech intelligibility in stationary noise.

U2 - 10.1097/AUD.0000000000000589

DO - 10.1097/AUD.0000000000000589

M3 - Journal article

JO - Ear and Hearing

JF - Ear and Hearing

SN - 0196-0202

ER -