Effects of antalarmin, a CRF receptor 1 antagonist, on fright reaction and endocrine stress response in crucian carp (Carassius carassius)

Stine Lastein, Erik Höglund, Oyvind Overli, Kjell B. Doving

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors show striking homogeneity throughout the vertebrate subphylum. In mammals, the CRF1 receptor (CRFR1) plays an important role in mediating behavioral and endocrine responses to fear and stress. The specific roles of this receptor subtype in fear and stress reactions in non-mammalian vertebrates are largely unknown. Crucian carp displays the olfactory-mediated fright reaction, a stereotypic behavioral response to waterborne cues from damaged skin of conspecifics. This reaction shows several similarities to basic components of avoidance behavior in mammals. In the present study, we applied the non-peptide CRFR1 antagonist, antalarmin, to crucian carp 1 h before exposure to conspecific skin extract. This treatment resulted in a suppression of the fright reaction. After skin extract exposure, antalarmin treatment also lead to lower plasma cortisol values, as compared to vehicle treatment. This suppression of the behavioral fright reaction and the stress induced rise in plasma cortisol in crucian carp suggests that the functions of the CRFR1 are conserved by evolution.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Comparative Physiology A. Sensory, neural, and behavioral physiology
Volume194
Issue number12
Pages (from-to)1007-1012
ISSN0340-7594
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • Fear
  • Cortisol
  • Brain
  • Olfaction
  • Teleost

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