Effective removal of antibiotic resistance genes and potential links with archaeal communities during vacuum-type composting and positive-pressure composting

Haonan Fan, Shanghua Wu, John Woodley, Guoqiang Zhuang, Zhihui Bai, Shengjun Xu, Xuan Wang, Xuliang Zhuang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

As a major reservoir of antibiotics, animal manure contributes a lot to the augmented environmental pressure of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). This might be the first study to explore the effects of different ventilation types on the control of ARGs and to identify the relationships between archaeal communities and ARGs during the composting of dairy manure. Several ARGs were quantified via Real-time qPCR and microbial communities including bacteria and archaea were analyzed by High-throughput sequencing during vacuum-type composting (VTC) and positive-pressure composting (PPC). The total detected ARGs and class I integrase gene (intI1) under VTC were significantly lower than that under PPC during each stage of the composting (p < 0.001). The relative abundance of potential human pathogenic bacteria (HPB) which were identified based on sequencing information and correlation analysis decreased by 74.6% and 91.4% at the end of PPC and VTC, respectively. The composition of archaeal communities indicated that methane-producing archaea including Methanobrevibacter, Methanocorpusculum and Methanosphaera were dominant throughout the composting. Redundancy analysis suggested that Methanobrevibacter and Methanocorpusculum were positively correlated with all of the detected ARGs. Network analysis determined that the possible hosts of ARGs were different under VTC and PPC, and provided new sights about potential links between archaea and ARGs. Our results showed better performance of VTC in reducing ARGs and potential HPB and demonstrated that some archaea could also be influential hosts of ARGs, and caution the risks of archaea carrying ARGs.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Environmental Sciences
Volume89
Pages (from-to)277-286
ISSN1001-0742
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Cite this

Fan, Haonan ; Wu, Shanghua ; Woodley, John ; Zhuang, Guoqiang ; Bai, Zhihui ; Xu, Shengjun ; Wang, Xuan ; Zhuang, Xuliang. / Effective removal of antibiotic resistance genes and potential links with archaeal communities during vacuum-type composting and positive-pressure composting. In: Journal of Environmental Sciences. 2020 ; Vol. 89. pp. 277-286.
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title = "Effective removal of antibiotic resistance genes and potential links with archaeal communities during vacuum-type composting and positive-pressure composting",
abstract = "As a major reservoir of antibiotics, animal manure contributes a lot to the augmented environmental pressure of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). This might be the first study to explore the effects of different ventilation types on the control of ARGs and to identify the relationships between archaeal communities and ARGs during the composting of dairy manure. Several ARGs were quantified via Real-time qPCR and microbial communities including bacteria and archaea were analyzed by High-throughput sequencing during vacuum-type composting (VTC) and positive-pressure composting (PPC). The total detected ARGs and class I integrase gene (intI1) under VTC were significantly lower than that under PPC during each stage of the composting (p < 0.001). The relative abundance of potential human pathogenic bacteria (HPB) which were identified based on sequencing information and correlation analysis decreased by 74.6{\%} and 91.4{\%} at the end of PPC and VTC, respectively. The composition of archaeal communities indicated that methane-producing archaea including Methanobrevibacter, Methanocorpusculum and Methanosphaera were dominant throughout the composting. Redundancy analysis suggested that Methanobrevibacter and Methanocorpusculum were positively correlated with all of the detected ARGs. Network analysis determined that the possible hosts of ARGs were different under VTC and PPC, and provided new sights about potential links between archaea and ARGs. Our results showed better performance of VTC in reducing ARGs and potential HPB and demonstrated that some archaea could also be influential hosts of ARGs, and caution the risks of archaea carrying ARGs.",
author = "Haonan Fan and Shanghua Wu and John Woodley and Guoqiang Zhuang and Zhihui Bai and Shengjun Xu and Xuan Wang and Xuliang Zhuang",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1016/j.jes.2019.09.006",
language = "English",
volume = "89",
pages = "277--286",
journal = "Journal of Environmental Sciences",
issn = "1001-0742",
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Effective removal of antibiotic resistance genes and potential links with archaeal communities during vacuum-type composting and positive-pressure composting. / Fan, Haonan; Wu, Shanghua; Woodley, John; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Bai, Zhihui; Xu, Shengjun; Wang, Xuan; Zhuang, Xuliang.

In: Journal of Environmental Sciences, Vol. 89, 2020, p. 277-286.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effective removal of antibiotic resistance genes and potential links with archaeal communities during vacuum-type composting and positive-pressure composting

AU - Fan, Haonan

AU - Wu, Shanghua

AU - Woodley, John

AU - Zhuang, Guoqiang

AU - Bai, Zhihui

AU - Xu, Shengjun

AU - Wang, Xuan

AU - Zhuang, Xuliang

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - As a major reservoir of antibiotics, animal manure contributes a lot to the augmented environmental pressure of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). This might be the first study to explore the effects of different ventilation types on the control of ARGs and to identify the relationships between archaeal communities and ARGs during the composting of dairy manure. Several ARGs were quantified via Real-time qPCR and microbial communities including bacteria and archaea were analyzed by High-throughput sequencing during vacuum-type composting (VTC) and positive-pressure composting (PPC). The total detected ARGs and class I integrase gene (intI1) under VTC were significantly lower than that under PPC during each stage of the composting (p < 0.001). The relative abundance of potential human pathogenic bacteria (HPB) which were identified based on sequencing information and correlation analysis decreased by 74.6% and 91.4% at the end of PPC and VTC, respectively. The composition of archaeal communities indicated that methane-producing archaea including Methanobrevibacter, Methanocorpusculum and Methanosphaera were dominant throughout the composting. Redundancy analysis suggested that Methanobrevibacter and Methanocorpusculum were positively correlated with all of the detected ARGs. Network analysis determined that the possible hosts of ARGs were different under VTC and PPC, and provided new sights about potential links between archaea and ARGs. Our results showed better performance of VTC in reducing ARGs and potential HPB and demonstrated that some archaea could also be influential hosts of ARGs, and caution the risks of archaea carrying ARGs.

AB - As a major reservoir of antibiotics, animal manure contributes a lot to the augmented environmental pressure of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). This might be the first study to explore the effects of different ventilation types on the control of ARGs and to identify the relationships between archaeal communities and ARGs during the composting of dairy manure. Several ARGs were quantified via Real-time qPCR and microbial communities including bacteria and archaea were analyzed by High-throughput sequencing during vacuum-type composting (VTC) and positive-pressure composting (PPC). The total detected ARGs and class I integrase gene (intI1) under VTC were significantly lower than that under PPC during each stage of the composting (p < 0.001). The relative abundance of potential human pathogenic bacteria (HPB) which were identified based on sequencing information and correlation analysis decreased by 74.6% and 91.4% at the end of PPC and VTC, respectively. The composition of archaeal communities indicated that methane-producing archaea including Methanobrevibacter, Methanocorpusculum and Methanosphaera were dominant throughout the composting. Redundancy analysis suggested that Methanobrevibacter and Methanocorpusculum were positively correlated with all of the detected ARGs. Network analysis determined that the possible hosts of ARGs were different under VTC and PPC, and provided new sights about potential links between archaea and ARGs. Our results showed better performance of VTC in reducing ARGs and potential HPB and demonstrated that some archaea could also be influential hosts of ARGs, and caution the risks of archaea carrying ARGs.

U2 - 10.1016/j.jes.2019.09.006

DO - 10.1016/j.jes.2019.09.006

M3 - Journal article

VL - 89

SP - 277

EP - 286

JO - Journal of Environmental Sciences

JF - Journal of Environmental Sciences

SN - 1001-0742

ER -