Effective population management practices in diabetes care - an observational study

Anne Frølich, Jim Bellows, Bo Friis Nielsen, Per B. Brockhoff, Martin Hefford

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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    Abstract

    Of fifteen diabetes care management practices, our data indicate that high performance is most associated with provider alerts and more weakly associated with action plans and with guideline distribution and training. Lack of convergence in the literature on effective care management practices suggests that factors contributing to high performance may be highly context-dependent or that the factors involved may be too numerous or their implementation too nuanced to be reliably identified in observational studies.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalB M C Health Services Research
    Volume10
    Pages (from-to)277
    ISSN1472-6963
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Bibliographical note

    This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Of fifteen diabetes care management practices, our data indicate that high performance is most associated with provider alerts and more weakly associated with action plans and with guideline distribution and training. Lack of convergence in the literature on effective care management practices suggests that factors contributing to high performance may be highly context-dependent or that the factors involved may be too numerous or their implementation too nuanced to be reliably identified in observational studies.",
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    Effective population management practices in diabetes care - an observational study. / Frølich, Anne; Bellows, Jim; Nielsen, Bo Friis; Brockhoff, Per B.; Hefford, Martin.

    In: B M C Health Services Research, Vol. 10, 2010, p. 277.

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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    AU - Frølich, Anne

    AU - Bellows, Jim

    AU - Nielsen, Bo Friis

    AU - Brockhoff, Per B.

    AU - Hefford, Martin

    N1 - This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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    N2 - Of fifteen diabetes care management practices, our data indicate that high performance is most associated with provider alerts and more weakly associated with action plans and with guideline distribution and training. Lack of convergence in the literature on effective care management practices suggests that factors contributing to high performance may be highly context-dependent or that the factors involved may be too numerous or their implementation too nuanced to be reliably identified in observational studies.

    AB - Of fifteen diabetes care management practices, our data indicate that high performance is most associated with provider alerts and more weakly associated with action plans and with guideline distribution and training. Lack of convergence in the literature on effective care management practices suggests that factors contributing to high performance may be highly context-dependent or that the factors involved may be too numerous or their implementation too nuanced to be reliably identified in observational studies.

    U2 - 10.1186/1472-6963-10-277

    DO - 10.1186/1472-6963-10-277

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    JO - B M C Health Services Research

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