Effect of Speech Rate on Neural Tracking of Speech

Jana Annina Mueller*, Dorothea Wendt, Birger Kollmeier, Stefan Debener, Thomas Brand

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

141 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Speech comprehension requires effort in demanding listening situations. Selective attention may be required for focusing on a specific talker in a multi-talker environment, may enhance effort by requiring additional cognitive resources, and is known to enhance the neural representation of the attended talker in the listener's neural response. The aim of the study was to investigate the relation of listening effort, as quantified by subjective effort ratings and pupil dilation, and neural speech tracking during sentence recognition. Task demands were varied using sentences with varying levels of linguistic complexity and using two different speech rates in a picture-matching paradigm with 20 normal-hearing listeners. The participant's task was to match the acoustically presented sentence with a picture presented before the acoustic stimulus. Afterwards they rated their perceived effort on a categorical effort scale. During each trial, pupil dilation (as an indicator of listening effort) and electroencephalogram (as an indicator of neural speech tracking) were recorded. Neither measure was significantly affected by linguistic complexity. However, speech rate showed a strong influence on subjectively rated effort, pupil dilation, and neural tracking. The neural tracking analysis revealed a shorter latency for faster sentences, which may reflect a neural adaptation to the rate of the input. No relation was found between neural tracking and listening effort, even though both measures were clearly influenced by speech rate. This is probably due to factors that influence both measures differently. Consequently, the amount of listening effort is not clearly represented in the neural tracking.
Original languageEnglish
Article number449
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume10
Number of pages15
ISSN1664-1078
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Listening effort
  • Neural tracking of speech
  • Linguistic complexity
  • Speech rate
  • Time-compressed sentences
  • Time-expanded sentences
  • Pupillometry
  • Speech comprehension

Cite this

Mueller, J. A., Wendt, D., Kollmeier, B., Debener, S., & Brand, T. (2019). Effect of Speech Rate on Neural Tracking of Speech. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, [449]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00449
Mueller, Jana Annina ; Wendt, Dorothea ; Kollmeier, Birger ; Debener, Stefan ; Brand, Thomas. / Effect of Speech Rate on Neural Tracking of Speech. In: Frontiers in Psychology. 2019 ; Vol. 10.
@article{caf769ae857f4f67b60a5056ba4e0a36,
title = "Effect of Speech Rate on Neural Tracking of Speech",
abstract = "Speech comprehension requires effort in demanding listening situations. Selective attention may be required for focusing on a specific talker in a multi-talker environment, may enhance effort by requiring additional cognitive resources, and is known to enhance the neural representation of the attended talker in the listener's neural response. The aim of the study was to investigate the relation of listening effort, as quantified by subjective effort ratings and pupil dilation, and neural speech tracking during sentence recognition. Task demands were varied using sentences with varying levels of linguistic complexity and using two different speech rates in a picture-matching paradigm with 20 normal-hearing listeners. The participant's task was to match the acoustically presented sentence with a picture presented before the acoustic stimulus. Afterwards they rated their perceived effort on a categorical effort scale. During each trial, pupil dilation (as an indicator of listening effort) and electroencephalogram (as an indicator of neural speech tracking) were recorded. Neither measure was significantly affected by linguistic complexity. However, speech rate showed a strong influence on subjectively rated effort, pupil dilation, and neural tracking. The neural tracking analysis revealed a shorter latency for faster sentences, which may reflect a neural adaptation to the rate of the input. No relation was found between neural tracking and listening effort, even though both measures were clearly influenced by speech rate. This is probably due to factors that influence both measures differently. Consequently, the amount of listening effort is not clearly represented in the neural tracking.",
keywords = "Listening effort, Neural tracking of speech, Linguistic complexity, Speech rate, Time-compressed sentences, Time-expanded sentences, Pupillometry, Speech comprehension",
author = "Mueller, {Jana Annina} and Dorothea Wendt and Birger Kollmeier and Stefan Debener and Thomas Brand",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00449",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "Frontiers in Psychology",
issn = "1664-1078",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S.A.",

}

Mueller, JA, Wendt, D, Kollmeier, B, Debener, S & Brand, T 2019, 'Effect of Speech Rate on Neural Tracking of Speech', Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 10, 449. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00449

Effect of Speech Rate on Neural Tracking of Speech. / Mueller, Jana Annina; Wendt, Dorothea; Kollmeier, Birger; Debener, Stefan; Brand, Thomas.

In: Frontiers in Psychology, Vol. 10, 449, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of Speech Rate on Neural Tracking of Speech

AU - Mueller, Jana Annina

AU - Wendt, Dorothea

AU - Kollmeier, Birger

AU - Debener, Stefan

AU - Brand, Thomas

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Speech comprehension requires effort in demanding listening situations. Selective attention may be required for focusing on a specific talker in a multi-talker environment, may enhance effort by requiring additional cognitive resources, and is known to enhance the neural representation of the attended talker in the listener's neural response. The aim of the study was to investigate the relation of listening effort, as quantified by subjective effort ratings and pupil dilation, and neural speech tracking during sentence recognition. Task demands were varied using sentences with varying levels of linguistic complexity and using two different speech rates in a picture-matching paradigm with 20 normal-hearing listeners. The participant's task was to match the acoustically presented sentence with a picture presented before the acoustic stimulus. Afterwards they rated their perceived effort on a categorical effort scale. During each trial, pupil dilation (as an indicator of listening effort) and electroencephalogram (as an indicator of neural speech tracking) were recorded. Neither measure was significantly affected by linguistic complexity. However, speech rate showed a strong influence on subjectively rated effort, pupil dilation, and neural tracking. The neural tracking analysis revealed a shorter latency for faster sentences, which may reflect a neural adaptation to the rate of the input. No relation was found between neural tracking and listening effort, even though both measures were clearly influenced by speech rate. This is probably due to factors that influence both measures differently. Consequently, the amount of listening effort is not clearly represented in the neural tracking.

AB - Speech comprehension requires effort in demanding listening situations. Selective attention may be required for focusing on a specific talker in a multi-talker environment, may enhance effort by requiring additional cognitive resources, and is known to enhance the neural representation of the attended talker in the listener's neural response. The aim of the study was to investigate the relation of listening effort, as quantified by subjective effort ratings and pupil dilation, and neural speech tracking during sentence recognition. Task demands were varied using sentences with varying levels of linguistic complexity and using two different speech rates in a picture-matching paradigm with 20 normal-hearing listeners. The participant's task was to match the acoustically presented sentence with a picture presented before the acoustic stimulus. Afterwards they rated their perceived effort on a categorical effort scale. During each trial, pupil dilation (as an indicator of listening effort) and electroencephalogram (as an indicator of neural speech tracking) were recorded. Neither measure was significantly affected by linguistic complexity. However, speech rate showed a strong influence on subjectively rated effort, pupil dilation, and neural tracking. The neural tracking analysis revealed a shorter latency for faster sentences, which may reflect a neural adaptation to the rate of the input. No relation was found between neural tracking and listening effort, even though both measures were clearly influenced by speech rate. This is probably due to factors that influence both measures differently. Consequently, the amount of listening effort is not clearly represented in the neural tracking.

KW - Listening effort

KW - Neural tracking of speech

KW - Linguistic complexity

KW - Speech rate

KW - Time-compressed sentences

KW - Time-expanded sentences

KW - Pupillometry

KW - Speech comprehension

U2 - 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00449

DO - 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00449

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30906273

VL - 10

JO - Frontiers in Psychology

JF - Frontiers in Psychology

SN - 1664-1078

M1 - 449

ER -