Ecosystem Resilience to Drought and Temperature Anomalies in the Mekong River Basin

T. Na-U-Dom, Monica Garcia*, X. Mo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Climate change is leading to an increasing in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events, which significantly affect ecosystems stability. In this study, ecological stability metrics in response to wet/dry events and warm/cold events on vegetation greenness were assessed using an auto-regressive model of NDVI in the Mekong River basin (around 759,000 km2) where large ecological and climatic gradients exist. Gridded temperature, and the Global Standard Precipitation Evaporation Index (SPEI) and antecedent NDVI were used as model predictors. The forest in north Laos was more resilient to the temperate and wet/dry anomalies events than other regions in the basin. Drought reduced green biomass in north Laos, northeast Thailand and Myanmar, but in these tropical climate regions' the vegetation biomass was also more responsive by higher temperatures. Vegetation in northeast Thailand, Cambodia and the Mekong delta were less sensitive to the temperature anomalies effect compared to other part of Mekong River basin. The map of resistance and resilience metrics can help to determine the most vulnerable regions to extreme events for policy makers.
Original languageEnglish
Article number012012
JournalI O P Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science
Volume68
Issue number1
Number of pages6
ISSN1755-1307
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Environmental Science (all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (all)
  • Climate change
  • Drought
  • Ecology
  • Rivers
  • Vegetation
  • Watersheds
  • Auto regressive models
  • Ecological stability
  • Ecosystem resilience
  • Extreme weather events
  • Gridded temperatures
  • Mekong river basins
  • Temperature anomaly
  • Vegetation greenness
  • Ecosystems
  • Rivers, runoff, and streamflow
  • Temperature of the lower atmosphere
  • Probability theory, stochastic processes, and statistics
  • Geophysical aspects of vegetation
  • Weather analysis and prediction
  • Climatology
  • atmospheric temperature
  • autoregressive processes
  • climatology
  • ecology
  • rivers
  • vegetation
  • weather forecasting
  • ecosystem resilience
  • temperature anomalies
  • drought anomalies
  • Mekong River Basin
  • extreme weather events
  • climate change
  • vegetation greenness
  • auto-regressive model
  • Global Standard Precipitation Evaporation Index
  • tropical climate regions’
  • resilience metrics
  • policy makers
  • Atmospheric Properties
  • Water Resources
  • Surface Water
  • Ecology and Ecosystems

Cite this

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title = "Ecosystem Resilience to Drought and Temperature Anomalies in the Mekong River Basin",
abstract = "Climate change is leading to an increasing in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events, which significantly affect ecosystems stability. In this study, ecological stability metrics in response to wet/dry events and warm/cold events on vegetation greenness were assessed using an auto-regressive model of NDVI in the Mekong River basin (around 759,000 km2) where large ecological and climatic gradients exist. Gridded temperature, and the Global Standard Precipitation Evaporation Index (SPEI) and antecedent NDVI were used as model predictors. The forest in north Laos was more resilient to the temperate and wet/dry anomalies events than other regions in the basin. Drought reduced green biomass in north Laos, northeast Thailand and Myanmar, but in these tropical climate regions' the vegetation biomass was also more responsive by higher temperatures. Vegetation in northeast Thailand, Cambodia and the Mekong delta were less sensitive to the temperature anomalies effect compared to other part of Mekong River basin. The map of resistance and resilience metrics can help to determine the most vulnerable regions to extreme events for policy makers.",
keywords = "Environmental Science (all), Earth and Planetary Sciences (all), Climate change, Drought, Ecology, Rivers, Vegetation, Watersheds, Auto regressive models, Ecological stability, Ecosystem resilience, Extreme weather events, Gridded temperatures, Mekong river basins, Temperature anomaly, Vegetation greenness, Ecosystems, Rivers, runoff, and streamflow, Temperature of the lower atmosphere, Probability theory, stochastic processes, and statistics, Geophysical aspects of vegetation, Weather analysis and prediction, Climatology, atmospheric temperature, autoregressive processes, climatology, ecology, rivers, vegetation, weather forecasting, ecosystem resilience, temperature anomalies, drought anomalies, Mekong River Basin, extreme weather events, climate change, vegetation greenness, auto-regressive model, Global Standard Precipitation Evaporation Index, tropical climate regions’, resilience metrics, policy makers, Atmospheric Properties, Water Resources, Surface Water, Ecology and Ecosystems",
author = "T. Na-U-Dom and Monica Garcia and X. Mo",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1088/1755-1315/68/1/012012",
language = "English",
volume = "68",
journal = "I O P Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science",
issn = "1755-1307",
publisher = "IOP Publishing",
number = "1",

}

Ecosystem Resilience to Drought and Temperature Anomalies in the Mekong River Basin. / Na-U-Dom, T.; Garcia, Monica; Mo, X.

In: I O P Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science, Vol. 68, No. 1, 012012, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ecosystem Resilience to Drought and Temperature Anomalies in the Mekong River Basin

AU - Na-U-Dom, T.

AU - Garcia, Monica

AU - Mo, X.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Climate change is leading to an increasing in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events, which significantly affect ecosystems stability. In this study, ecological stability metrics in response to wet/dry events and warm/cold events on vegetation greenness were assessed using an auto-regressive model of NDVI in the Mekong River basin (around 759,000 km2) where large ecological and climatic gradients exist. Gridded temperature, and the Global Standard Precipitation Evaporation Index (SPEI) and antecedent NDVI were used as model predictors. The forest in north Laos was more resilient to the temperate and wet/dry anomalies events than other regions in the basin. Drought reduced green biomass in north Laos, northeast Thailand and Myanmar, but in these tropical climate regions' the vegetation biomass was also more responsive by higher temperatures. Vegetation in northeast Thailand, Cambodia and the Mekong delta were less sensitive to the temperature anomalies effect compared to other part of Mekong River basin. The map of resistance and resilience metrics can help to determine the most vulnerable regions to extreme events for policy makers.

AB - Climate change is leading to an increasing in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events, which significantly affect ecosystems stability. In this study, ecological stability metrics in response to wet/dry events and warm/cold events on vegetation greenness were assessed using an auto-regressive model of NDVI in the Mekong River basin (around 759,000 km2) where large ecological and climatic gradients exist. Gridded temperature, and the Global Standard Precipitation Evaporation Index (SPEI) and antecedent NDVI were used as model predictors. The forest in north Laos was more resilient to the temperate and wet/dry anomalies events than other regions in the basin. Drought reduced green biomass in north Laos, northeast Thailand and Myanmar, but in these tropical climate regions' the vegetation biomass was also more responsive by higher temperatures. Vegetation in northeast Thailand, Cambodia and the Mekong delta were less sensitive to the temperature anomalies effect compared to other part of Mekong River basin. The map of resistance and resilience metrics can help to determine the most vulnerable regions to extreme events for policy makers.

KW - Environmental Science (all)

KW - Earth and Planetary Sciences (all)

KW - Climate change

KW - Drought

KW - Ecology

KW - Rivers

KW - Vegetation

KW - Watersheds

KW - Auto regressive models

KW - Ecological stability

KW - Ecosystem resilience

KW - Extreme weather events

KW - Gridded temperatures

KW - Mekong river basins

KW - Temperature anomaly

KW - Vegetation greenness

KW - Ecosystems

KW - Rivers, runoff, and streamflow

KW - Temperature of the lower atmosphere

KW - Probability theory, stochastic processes, and statistics

KW - Geophysical aspects of vegetation

KW - Weather analysis and prediction

KW - Climatology

KW - atmospheric temperature

KW - autoregressive processes

KW - climatology

KW - ecology

KW - rivers

KW - vegetation

KW - weather forecasting

KW - ecosystem resilience

KW - temperature anomalies

KW - drought anomalies

KW - Mekong River Basin

KW - extreme weather events

KW - climate change

KW - vegetation greenness

KW - auto-regressive model

KW - Global Standard Precipitation Evaporation Index

KW - tropical climate regions’

KW - resilience metrics

KW - policy makers

KW - Atmospheric Properties

KW - Water Resources

KW - Surface Water

KW - Ecology and Ecosystems

U2 - 10.1088/1755-1315/68/1/012012

DO - 10.1088/1755-1315/68/1/012012

M3 - Journal article

VL - 68

JO - I O P Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science

JF - I O P Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science

SN - 1755-1307

IS - 1

M1 - 012012

ER -