Eating out, weight and weight gain. A cross-sectional and prospective analysis in the context of the EPIC-PANACEA study

A. Naska, P. Orfanos, A. Trichopoulou, A. M. May, K. Overvad, Marianne Uhre Jakobsen, A. Tjonneland, J. Halkjaer, G. Fagherazzi, F. Clavel-Chapelon, M-C Boutron-Ruault, S. Rohrmann, S. Hermann, A. Steffen, J. Haubrock, E. Oikonomou, V. Dilis, M. Katsoulis, C. Sacerdote, S. Sieri & 26 others G. Masala, R. Tumino, A. Mattiello, H. B. Bueno-de-Mesquita, G. Skeie, D. Engeset, A. Barricarte, L. Rodriguez, M. Dorronsoro, M-J Sanchez, M-D Chirlaque, A. Agudo, J. Manjer, E. Wirfalt, V. Hellstrom, D. Shungin, K-T Khaw, N. J. Wareham, E. A. Spencer, H. Freisling, N. Slimani, A-C Vergnaud, T. Mouw, D. Romaguera, A. Odysseos, P. H. M. Peeters

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the association of body mass index (BMI) and weight gain with eating at restaurants and similar establishments or eating at work among 10 European countries of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.Subjects: This study included a representative sample of 24 310 randomly selected EPIC participants. Methods: Single 24-h dietary recalls with information on the place of consumption were collected using standardized procedures between 1995 and 2000. Eating at restaurants was defined to include all eating and drinking occasions at restaurants, cafeterias, bars and fast food outlets. Eating at work included all eating and drinking occasions at the workplace. Associations between eating at restaurants or eating at work and BMI or annual weight changes were assessed using sex-specific linear mixed-effects models, controlling for potential confounders. Results: In southern Europe energy intake at restaurants was higher than intake at work, whereas in northern Europe eating at work appeared to contribute more to the mean daily intake than eating at restaurants. Cross-sectionally, eating at restaurants was found to be positively associated with BMI only among men (beta = +0.24, P = 0.003). Essentially no association was found between BMI and eating at work among both genders. In a prospective analysis among men, eating at restaurants was found to be positively, albeit nonsignificantly, associated with weight gain (beta = +0.05, P = 0.368). No association was detected between energy intake at restaurants and weight changes, controlling for total energy intake. Conclusion: Among men, eating at restaurants and similar establishments was associated with higher BMI and possibly weight gain.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume35
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)416-426
Number of pages11
ISSN0307-0565
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Eating at restaurants
  • Eating at work
  • EPIC-PANACEA
  • Weight gain

Cite this

Naska, A. ; Orfanos, P. ; Trichopoulou, A. ; May, A. M. ; Overvad, K. ; Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre ; Tjonneland, A. ; Halkjaer, J. ; Fagherazzi, G. ; Clavel-Chapelon, F. ; Boutron-Ruault, M-C ; Rohrmann, S. ; Hermann, S. ; Steffen, A. ; Haubrock, J. ; Oikonomou, E. ; Dilis, V. ; Katsoulis, M. ; Sacerdote, C. ; Sieri, S. ; Masala, G. ; Tumino, R. ; Mattiello, A. ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B. ; Skeie, G. ; Engeset, D. ; Barricarte, A. ; Rodriguez, L. ; Dorronsoro, M. ; Sanchez, M-J ; Chirlaque, M-D ; Agudo, A. ; Manjer, J. ; Wirfalt, E. ; Hellstrom, V. ; Shungin, D. ; Khaw, K-T ; Wareham, N. J. ; Spencer, E. A. ; Freisling, H. ; Slimani, N. ; Vergnaud, A-C ; Mouw, T. ; Romaguera, D. ; Odysseos, A. ; Peeters, P. H. M. / Eating out, weight and weight gain. A cross-sectional and prospective analysis in the context of the EPIC-PANACEA study. In: International Journal of Obesity. 2011 ; Vol. 35, No. 3. pp. 416-426.
@article{5124343aee964812869f33fe860e19b6,
title = "Eating out, weight and weight gain. A cross-sectional and prospective analysis in the context of the EPIC-PANACEA study",
abstract = "Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the association of body mass index (BMI) and weight gain with eating at restaurants and similar establishments or eating at work among 10 European countries of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.Subjects: This study included a representative sample of 24 310 randomly selected EPIC participants. Methods: Single 24-h dietary recalls with information on the place of consumption were collected using standardized procedures between 1995 and 2000. Eating at restaurants was defined to include all eating and drinking occasions at restaurants, cafeterias, bars and fast food outlets. Eating at work included all eating and drinking occasions at the workplace. Associations between eating at restaurants or eating at work and BMI or annual weight changes were assessed using sex-specific linear mixed-effects models, controlling for potential confounders. Results: In southern Europe energy intake at restaurants was higher than intake at work, whereas in northern Europe eating at work appeared to contribute more to the mean daily intake than eating at restaurants. Cross-sectionally, eating at restaurants was found to be positively associated with BMI only among men (beta = +0.24, P = 0.003). Essentially no association was found between BMI and eating at work among both genders. In a prospective analysis among men, eating at restaurants was found to be positively, albeit nonsignificantly, associated with weight gain (beta = +0.05, P = 0.368). No association was detected between energy intake at restaurants and weight changes, controlling for total energy intake. Conclusion: Among men, eating at restaurants and similar establishments was associated with higher BMI and possibly weight gain.",
keywords = "Body mass index, Eating at restaurants, Eating at work, EPIC-PANACEA, Weight gain",
author = "A. Naska and P. Orfanos and A. Trichopoulou and May, {A. M.} and K. Overvad and Jakobsen, {Marianne Uhre} and A. Tjonneland and J. Halkjaer and G. Fagherazzi and F. Clavel-Chapelon and M-C Boutron-Ruault and S. Rohrmann and S. Hermann and A. Steffen and J. Haubrock and E. Oikonomou and V. Dilis and M. Katsoulis and C. Sacerdote and S. Sieri and G. Masala and R. Tumino and A. Mattiello and Bueno-de-Mesquita, {H. B.} and G. Skeie and D. Engeset and A. Barricarte and L. Rodriguez and M. Dorronsoro and M-J Sanchez and M-D Chirlaque and A. Agudo and J. Manjer and E. Wirfalt and V. Hellstrom and D. Shungin and K-T Khaw and Wareham, {N. J.} and Spencer, {E. A.} and H. Freisling and N. Slimani and A-C Vergnaud and T. Mouw and D. Romaguera and A. Odysseos and Peeters, {P. H. M.}",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1038/ijo.2010.142",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "416--426",
journal = "International Journal of Obesity",
issn = "0307-0565",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "3",

}

Naska, A, Orfanos, P, Trichopoulou, A, May, AM, Overvad, K, Jakobsen, MU, Tjonneland, A, Halkjaer, J, Fagherazzi, G, Clavel-Chapelon, F, Boutron-Ruault, M-C, Rohrmann, S, Hermann, S, Steffen, A, Haubrock, J, Oikonomou, E, Dilis, V, Katsoulis, M, Sacerdote, C, Sieri, S, Masala, G, Tumino, R, Mattiello, A, Bueno-de-Mesquita, HB, Skeie, G, Engeset, D, Barricarte, A, Rodriguez, L, Dorronsoro, M, Sanchez, M-J, Chirlaque, M-D, Agudo, A, Manjer, J, Wirfalt, E, Hellstrom, V, Shungin, D, Khaw, K-T, Wareham, NJ, Spencer, EA, Freisling, H, Slimani, N, Vergnaud, A-C, Mouw, T, Romaguera, D, Odysseos, A & Peeters, PHM 2011, 'Eating out, weight and weight gain. A cross-sectional and prospective analysis in the context of the EPIC-PANACEA study', International Journal of Obesity, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 416-426. https://doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2010.142

Eating out, weight and weight gain. A cross-sectional and prospective analysis in the context of the EPIC-PANACEA study. / Naska, A.; Orfanos, P.; Trichopoulou, A.; May, A. M.; Overvad, K.; Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; Tjonneland, A.; Halkjaer, J.; Fagherazzi, G.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Boutron-Ruault, M-C; Rohrmann, S.; Hermann, S.; Steffen, A.; Haubrock, J.; Oikonomou, E.; Dilis, V.; Katsoulis, M.; Sacerdote, C.; Sieri, S.; Masala, G.; Tumino, R.; Mattiello, A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.; Skeie, G.; Engeset, D.; Barricarte, A.; Rodriguez, L.; Dorronsoro, M.; Sanchez, M-J; Chirlaque, M-D; Agudo, A.; Manjer, J.; Wirfalt, E.; Hellstrom, V.; Shungin, D.; Khaw, K-T; Wareham, N. J.; Spencer, E. A.; Freisling, H.; Slimani, N.; Vergnaud, A-C; Mouw, T.; Romaguera, D.; Odysseos, A.; Peeters, P. H. M.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 35, No. 3, 2011, p. 416-426.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Eating out, weight and weight gain. A cross-sectional and prospective analysis in the context of the EPIC-PANACEA study

AU - Naska, A.

AU - Orfanos, P.

AU - Trichopoulou, A.

AU - May, A. M.

AU - Overvad, K.

AU - Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre

AU - Tjonneland, A.

AU - Halkjaer, J.

AU - Fagherazzi, G.

AU - Clavel-Chapelon, F.

AU - Boutron-Ruault, M-C

AU - Rohrmann, S.

AU - Hermann, S.

AU - Steffen, A.

AU - Haubrock, J.

AU - Oikonomou, E.

AU - Dilis, V.

AU - Katsoulis, M.

AU - Sacerdote, C.

AU - Sieri, S.

AU - Masala, G.

AU - Tumino, R.

AU - Mattiello, A.

AU - Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.

AU - Skeie, G.

AU - Engeset, D.

AU - Barricarte, A.

AU - Rodriguez, L.

AU - Dorronsoro, M.

AU - Sanchez, M-J

AU - Chirlaque, M-D

AU - Agudo, A.

AU - Manjer, J.

AU - Wirfalt, E.

AU - Hellstrom, V.

AU - Shungin, D.

AU - Khaw, K-T

AU - Wareham, N. J.

AU - Spencer, E. A.

AU - Freisling, H.

AU - Slimani, N.

AU - Vergnaud, A-C

AU - Mouw, T.

AU - Romaguera, D.

AU - Odysseos, A.

AU - Peeters, P. H. M.

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the association of body mass index (BMI) and weight gain with eating at restaurants and similar establishments or eating at work among 10 European countries of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.Subjects: This study included a representative sample of 24 310 randomly selected EPIC participants. Methods: Single 24-h dietary recalls with information on the place of consumption were collected using standardized procedures between 1995 and 2000. Eating at restaurants was defined to include all eating and drinking occasions at restaurants, cafeterias, bars and fast food outlets. Eating at work included all eating and drinking occasions at the workplace. Associations between eating at restaurants or eating at work and BMI or annual weight changes were assessed using sex-specific linear mixed-effects models, controlling for potential confounders. Results: In southern Europe energy intake at restaurants was higher than intake at work, whereas in northern Europe eating at work appeared to contribute more to the mean daily intake than eating at restaurants. Cross-sectionally, eating at restaurants was found to be positively associated with BMI only among men (beta = +0.24, P = 0.003). Essentially no association was found between BMI and eating at work among both genders. In a prospective analysis among men, eating at restaurants was found to be positively, albeit nonsignificantly, associated with weight gain (beta = +0.05, P = 0.368). No association was detected between energy intake at restaurants and weight changes, controlling for total energy intake. Conclusion: Among men, eating at restaurants and similar establishments was associated with higher BMI and possibly weight gain.

AB - Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the association of body mass index (BMI) and weight gain with eating at restaurants and similar establishments or eating at work among 10 European countries of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.Subjects: This study included a representative sample of 24 310 randomly selected EPIC participants. Methods: Single 24-h dietary recalls with information on the place of consumption were collected using standardized procedures between 1995 and 2000. Eating at restaurants was defined to include all eating and drinking occasions at restaurants, cafeterias, bars and fast food outlets. Eating at work included all eating and drinking occasions at the workplace. Associations between eating at restaurants or eating at work and BMI or annual weight changes were assessed using sex-specific linear mixed-effects models, controlling for potential confounders. Results: In southern Europe energy intake at restaurants was higher than intake at work, whereas in northern Europe eating at work appeared to contribute more to the mean daily intake than eating at restaurants. Cross-sectionally, eating at restaurants was found to be positively associated with BMI only among men (beta = +0.24, P = 0.003). Essentially no association was found between BMI and eating at work among both genders. In a prospective analysis among men, eating at restaurants was found to be positively, albeit nonsignificantly, associated with weight gain (beta = +0.05, P = 0.368). No association was detected between energy intake at restaurants and weight changes, controlling for total energy intake. Conclusion: Among men, eating at restaurants and similar establishments was associated with higher BMI and possibly weight gain.

KW - Body mass index

KW - Eating at restaurants

KW - Eating at work

KW - EPIC-PANACEA

KW - Weight gain

U2 - 10.1038/ijo.2010.142

DO - 10.1038/ijo.2010.142

M3 - Journal article

VL - 35

SP - 416

EP - 426

JO - International Journal of Obesity

JF - International Journal of Obesity

SN - 0307-0565

IS - 3

ER -