Dislocation density in fine grain-size spark-plasma sintered aluminum measured using high brightness synchrotron radiation

C.L. Zhang, A. Godfrey*, Y. Zhang, G. L. Wu, Ruichao Xu, W. Liu, D. Juul Jensen

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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    Abstract

    Three-dimensional orientation mapping of samples of aluminum prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS) with average grain sizes of 5 μm and 1 μm has been carried out using high-brightness synchrotron radiation, from which the geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) density has been determined. The low average measured GND density values confirm that the SPS process can be used to produce samples containing grains with dislocation density similar to that of fully recrystallized coarse-grained samples. Values of GND density are also compared to those obtained from electron back-scatter diffraction studies on the same material, highlighting the significantly higher angular resolution of the synchrotron data. For the 5 μm grain-size sample the measured GND density can account for a large fraction of the previously observed positive Hall-Petch deviation of this material. For the 1 μm grain-size sample, however, the GND-based strengthening contribution is much smaller than the reported positive Hall-Petch deviation, such that the additional strength may be reliably associated with dislocation source-limited strengthening.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number127653
    JournalMaterials Letters
    Volume269
    Number of pages4
    ISSN0167-577X
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2020

    Bibliographical note

    GA no. 788567

    Keywords

    • X-ray techniques
    • Metals and alloys
    • Synchrotron radiation
    • Spark plasma sintering
    • Geometrically necessary dislocations

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