Discovery of Human IgGs against α-Cobratoxin for Development of Recombinant Antibody-based Antivenom

Andreas Hougaard Laustsen, Mikael Engmark, Arne Redsted Rasmussen, Brian Lohse

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearchpeer-review

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    Abstract

    More than 5.5 million people are bitten by venomous snakes per year on a global basis. This leads to approx. 125,000 deaths and 3 times as many amputations. Particularly Sub-Saharan Africa is affected by the problem. Current antivenoms are still being produced by a method developed in the 1890’s, in which large mammals (typically horses) are immunized with snake venom and antiserum is derived from the animals blood. The incompatibility with the human immune system of these animal derived antivenoms leads to a range of side effects,such as serum sickness, anaphylaxis, and sometimes even death. Despite the maturity of medicinal chemistry and advances in drug development, there remains a need for modern antivenoms with better safety profile and improved efficacy [4].We have set out to tackle this challenge by attempting to develop the World’s first antivenom based on recombinant, humanized antibodies. Such an antivenom will be cheaper to produce in large scale and is anticipated to have a much improved safety and efficacy profile.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication date2014
    Number of pages1
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    EventPhD Day 2014, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen - Copenhagen, Denmark
    Duration: 22 May 201422 May 2014

    Other

    OtherPhD Day 2014, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen
    Country/TerritoryDenmark
    CityCopenhagen
    Period22/05/201422/05/2014

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