Differential bacterial capture and transport preferences facilitate co-growth on dietary xylan in the human gut

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article – Annual report year: 2018Researchpeer-review

Standard

Differential bacterial capture and transport preferences facilitate co-growth on dietary xylan in the human gut. / Leth, Maria Louise; Ejby, Morten; Workman, Christopher; Ewald, David Adrian; Pedersen, Signe Schultz; Sternberg, Claus; Bahl, Martin Iain; Licht, Tine Rask; Aachmann, Finn Lillelund; Westereng, Bjørge; Abou Hachem, Maher .

In: Nature Microbiology, 2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article – Annual report year: 2018Researchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{ebea4f85c726415c957ba36a3c7fcb9c,
title = "Differential bacterial capture and transport preferences facilitate co-growth on dietary xylan in the human gut",
abstract = "Metabolism of dietary glycans is pivotal in shaping the human gut microbiota. However, the mechanisms that promote competition for glycans among gut commensals remain unclear. Roseburia intestinalis, an abundant butyrate-producing Firmicute, is a key degrader of the major dietary fibre xylan. Despite the association of this taxon to a healthy microbiota, insight is lacking into its glycan utilization machinery. Here, we investigate the apparatus that confers R. intestinalis growth on different xylans. R. intestinalis displays a large cell-attached modular xylanase that promotes multivalent and dynamic association to xylan via four xylan-binding modules. This xylanase operates in concert with an ATP-binding cassette transporter to mediate breakdown and selective internalization of xylan fragments. The transport protein of R. intestinalis prefers oligomers of 4-5 xylosyl units, whereas the counterpart from a model xylan-degrading Bacteroides commensal targets larger ligands. Although R. intestinalis and the Bacteroides competitor co-grew in a mixed culture on xylan, R. intestinalis dominated on the preferred transport substrate xylotetraose. These findings highlight the differentiation of capture and transport preferences as a possible strategy to facilitate co-growth on abundant dietary fibres and may offer a unique route to manipulate the microbiota based on glycan transport preferences in therapeutic interventions to boost distinct taxa.",
author = "Leth, {Maria Louise} and Morten Ejby and Christopher Workman and Ewald, {David Adrian} and Pedersen, {Signe Schultz} and Claus Sternberg and Bahl, {Martin Iain} and Licht, {Tine Rask} and Aachmann, {Finn Lillelund} and Bj{\o}rge Westereng and {Abou Hachem}, Maher",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1038/s41564-018-0132-8",
language = "English",
journal = "Nature Microbiology",
issn = "2058-5276",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Differential bacterial capture and transport preferences facilitate co-growth on dietary xylan in the human gut

AU - Leth, Maria Louise

AU - Ejby, Morten

AU - Workman, Christopher

AU - Ewald, David Adrian

AU - Pedersen, Signe Schultz

AU - Sternberg, Claus

AU - Bahl, Martin Iain

AU - Licht, Tine Rask

AU - Aachmann, Finn Lillelund

AU - Westereng, Bjørge

AU - Abou Hachem, Maher

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Metabolism of dietary glycans is pivotal in shaping the human gut microbiota. However, the mechanisms that promote competition for glycans among gut commensals remain unclear. Roseburia intestinalis, an abundant butyrate-producing Firmicute, is a key degrader of the major dietary fibre xylan. Despite the association of this taxon to a healthy microbiota, insight is lacking into its glycan utilization machinery. Here, we investigate the apparatus that confers R. intestinalis growth on different xylans. R. intestinalis displays a large cell-attached modular xylanase that promotes multivalent and dynamic association to xylan via four xylan-binding modules. This xylanase operates in concert with an ATP-binding cassette transporter to mediate breakdown and selective internalization of xylan fragments. The transport protein of R. intestinalis prefers oligomers of 4-5 xylosyl units, whereas the counterpart from a model xylan-degrading Bacteroides commensal targets larger ligands. Although R. intestinalis and the Bacteroides competitor co-grew in a mixed culture on xylan, R. intestinalis dominated on the preferred transport substrate xylotetraose. These findings highlight the differentiation of capture and transport preferences as a possible strategy to facilitate co-growth on abundant dietary fibres and may offer a unique route to manipulate the microbiota based on glycan transport preferences in therapeutic interventions to boost distinct taxa.

AB - Metabolism of dietary glycans is pivotal in shaping the human gut microbiota. However, the mechanisms that promote competition for glycans among gut commensals remain unclear. Roseburia intestinalis, an abundant butyrate-producing Firmicute, is a key degrader of the major dietary fibre xylan. Despite the association of this taxon to a healthy microbiota, insight is lacking into its glycan utilization machinery. Here, we investigate the apparatus that confers R. intestinalis growth on different xylans. R. intestinalis displays a large cell-attached modular xylanase that promotes multivalent and dynamic association to xylan via four xylan-binding modules. This xylanase operates in concert with an ATP-binding cassette transporter to mediate breakdown and selective internalization of xylan fragments. The transport protein of R. intestinalis prefers oligomers of 4-5 xylosyl units, whereas the counterpart from a model xylan-degrading Bacteroides commensal targets larger ligands. Although R. intestinalis and the Bacteroides competitor co-grew in a mixed culture on xylan, R. intestinalis dominated on the preferred transport substrate xylotetraose. These findings highlight the differentiation of capture and transport preferences as a possible strategy to facilitate co-growth on abundant dietary fibres and may offer a unique route to manipulate the microbiota based on glycan transport preferences in therapeutic interventions to boost distinct taxa.

U2 - 10.1038/s41564-018-0132-8

DO - 10.1038/s41564-018-0132-8

M3 - Journal article

JO - Nature Microbiology

JF - Nature Microbiology

SN - 2058-5276

ER -