Diets supplemented with seaweed affect metabolic rate, innate immune, and antioxidant responses, but not individual growth rate in European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax)

Maria J. Peixoto, Jon Christian Svendsen, Hans Malte, Pedro Carvalho, Rui Pereira, José F. M. Gonçalves, Rodrigo O. A. Ozório

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of seaweed dietary supplementation on measures of fish performance including aerobic metabolism, digestive enzymes activity, innate immune status, oxidative damage, and growth rate using European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Fish were fed for 49 days with three different diets: a control diet (CTRL), a Gracilaria-supplemented diet (GR7.5), and a mixed diet (Mix) composed of Gracilaria, Fucus, and Ulva genera representatives. All diets were isoenergetic (22 kJ g−1 adjusted for dry matter (DM)), isoproteic (47 %DM), and isolipidic (18 %DM) and tested in triplicate groups of 20 fish (initial body weight 25.5 ± 4.1 g). Final results showed similar growth rates and digestive activities between diets. Maximum and standard metabolic rates and aerobic metabolic scope revealed comparable results for the three diets. In contrast, fish fed with GR7.5 exhibited elevated routine metabolic rate (190.7 mg O2 kg−1 h−1). Fish fed with the GR7.5 and Mix diets had lower alternative complement pathway (ACH50) (62.5 and 63 units mL−1 respectively) than CTRL (84 units mL−1) GR7.5 increased lipid peroxidation and cholinesterase levels, as well as glutathione s-transferase activity. Mix diet increased glutathione reductase activity when compared to CTRL. Collectively, our findings suggest that dietary seaweed supplementation may alter seabass metabolic rate, innate immune, and antioxidant responses without compromising growth parameters
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Applied Phycology
Volume28
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)2061-2071
ISSN0921-8971
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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