Dietary whole-grain wheat increases intestinal levels of bifidobacteria in humans and bifidobacterial abundance is negatively correlated with the effect of fecal water on trans-epithelial resistance in vitro.

Ellen Gerd Christensen, Tine Rask Licht, M. Kristensen, Martin Iain Bahl

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Abstract

Consumption of whole grain products are considered to have beneficial effects on human health including decreased risk of cardiovascular disease. However, effects on gut microbial composition have only been studied limitedly. We used quantitative PCR to determine changes in the gut bacterial composition in post-menopausal women following a 12-week energy restricted intervention with whole-grain wheat (WW, n=37) or refined wheat (RW, n=33). The WW intervention significantly increased the relative abundance of Bifidobacterium. Caco-2 cells were exposed to fecal water to determine effects of the bacterial community metabolites on the trans-epithelial resistance (TER). Fecal water increased TER independent of diet, indicating that commensal bacteria provide metabolites facilitating an increase in intestinal integrity. TER was unexpectedly found to be negatively correlated to the relative abundance of Bifidobacterium. The present study suggests that increase of specific bacterial groups, which are considered beneficial, may in some circumstances increase the permeability of the intestinal wall.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2013
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2013
EventCell Symposia: Microbiome and Host Health - Lisbon, Portugal
Duration: 12 May 201314 May 2013
http://www.cell-symposia-microbiome.com/

Conference

ConferenceCell Symposia
Country/TerritoryPortugal
CityLisbon
Period12/05/201314/05/2013
Internet address

Keywords

  • Gut microbiota
  • Whole-grain weat
  • Trans-epithelial resistance
  • Bifidobacterium

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