Dietary iodine intake and urinary iodine excretion in a Danish population: effect of geography, supplements and food choice

Lone Banke Rasmussen, L. Ovesen, I. Bulow, T. Jorgensen, N. Knudsen, P. Laurberg, H. Perrild

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

I deficiency diseases remain a health problem even in some developed countries. Therefore, measurement of I intake and knowledge about food choice related to I intake is important. We examined I intake in 4649 randomy selected participants from two cities in Denmark (Copenhagen and Aalborg) with an expected difference in I intake. I intake was assessed both by a food frequency questionnaire and by measuring I in casual urine samples. I excretion was expressed as a concentration and as estimated 24-h I excretion. Further, subgroups with low I intake were recognized. I intake was lower in Aalborg than in Copenhagen for all expressions, and lower than recommended in both cities if I intake from supplements was not included. Milk was the most important I source, accounting for about 44% of the I intake, and milk (P
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume87
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)61-69
ISSN0007-1145
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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